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You may have heard of the Myers Briggs personality profile test. Is there a similar test for societies?

The MB has four dimensions

  • Introversion/Extraversion
  • iNtuition/Sensing
  • Feeling/Thinking
  • Perception/Judging

I'm thinking that a society (which could be as large as a nation, or as small as an office) will have other attributes, such as

  • Patriarchal/Matriarchal
  • Corporate/Entrepreneur
  • Rural/Urban
  • Centralized/Decentralized (government)
  • Religious/Secular

etc. Does a "society profile test" like that already exist? Hopefully with data already collected?

Sorry if this is off topic. I couldn't find any "sociology stack exchange"

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closed as off-topic by nominally rigid, Lumi, Martin Van der Linden, Ubiquitous Dec 21 at 20:00

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about economics, within the scope defined in the help center." – nominally rigid, Lumi, Martin Van der Linden, Ubiquitous
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Strictly speaking this is off-topic here, although economists are constantly on the lookout for non-economic traits to incorporate into their models. The good news is that even if the question gets closed, it already received an apparently stimulating answer. –  Alecos Papadopoulos Dec 19 at 20:13
    
Please see: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnopsychology –  Deer Hunter Dec 20 at 12:12
1  
There's also Cognitive Sciences SE. –  Deer Hunter Dec 20 at 12:13

1 Answer 1

Jonathan Haidt has used a five axis model to characterize groups by their use of 5 sets of moral intuitions.

Harm/care, Fairness/reciprocity, Ingroup/loyalty, Authority/ respect, and Purity/sanctity. Across 4 studies using multiple methods, liberals consistently showed greater endorsement and use of the Harm/care and Fairness/reciprocity foundations compared to the other 3 foundations, whereas conservatives endorsed and used the 5 foundations more equally.

He's got several papers in this area. I don't know of any attempts to use this framework to describe groups other than liberals, conservatives, and libertarians, but in principle you could.

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