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3 comment from Energy Numbers
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Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8 and here: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/q/quantitative-easing.asp

Edit: comment from Energy numbers: strictly speaking government borrowing money from central banks doesn't increase the money supply, it only increases when the government spends the borrowed money.

Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8 and here: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/q/quantitative-easing.asp

Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8 and here: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/q/quantitative-easing.asp

Edit: comment from Energy numbers: strictly speaking government borrowing money from central banks doesn't increase the money supply, it only increases when the government spends the borrowed money.

2 added a second link to intvestopedia for clarification...
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Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8 and here: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/q/quantitative-easing.asp

Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8

Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8 and here: http://www.investopedia.com/terms/q/quantitative-easing.asp

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Central banks can create money 'out of nothing'. So for starters there isn't 'less amount' of money left with the central bank. The amount of money at the central bank is 'infinite'. So it's not because the CB lends X amount of money to the government, that the CB has X amount less money to lend to the banks, the supply of money is not constrained... Off course, creating too much money and monetizing debt can have negative consequences for sure (for example hyperinflation in extreme cases), but that's another discussion. See also here for more info about quantitative easing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TihoBfdCe8