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If a publicly traded company buys back all it's shares from the public, majority holder and every last person that owns it's shares who would own the company? Obviously, it wouldn't be a normal privately owned entity because all it's shares are owned by the company itself hence the company owns itself. So, who will act as the decision maker of the company and who will get the voting rights of the shares? Because a corporation is technically a person but not a physical person at the same time. it has the necessary rights to own itself but it won't be able to think and make decisions. So, how will such a company function?

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closed as off-topic by EnergyNumbers, Kitsune Cavalry, VicAche, Fix.B., emeryville Jun 12 '16 at 5:27

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    $\begingroup$ Such a situation is unlikely to happen. The owner who sells the company the last share is the solitary owner. As such, he could have the money offered without giving the last share back. (This does not answer legal feasability.) $\endgroup$ – Giskard Jun 4 '16 at 17:32
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about economics. It's about corporation law. $\endgroup$ – EnergyNumbers Jun 4 '16 at 18:28
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, its more of a legalistic question than anything else. Two points: a) that's a way to dissolve a firm, by selling all its assets, liquidating all its debtors employees, and finnally buying back all shares. $\endgroup$ – Fix.B. Jun 9 '16 at 3:29
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, its more of a legalistic question than anything else. Three points: a) that's a way to dissolve a firm, by selling all its assets, liquidating all its debtors employees, and finally buying back all shares; b) The last share owner would price the last share at the total value of the firm, so when the firm pays him it would be bankrupt; c) Legally, I suppose that the last shareholder is effectively the decision maker, which would imply that he still owns the firm even if he buys himself out. $\endgroup$ – Fix.B. Jun 9 '16 at 3:38