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Is there a list of the countries where the central bank is creating money, today ?
How much ? We know for:

  • EUR: Euro countries (since ECB QEs) (and euro-bound countries as DKK ?)
  • YEN: Japan (BOJ 'abenomics')
  • GBP: UK (BoE)
  • SEK: Scandinavia (SNB)

But what about the other 200 countries ?

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Every central bank creates money, it's the reason why these institutions are created. The central bank is "the lender of last resort", which means that it is responsible for providing its economy with funds when commercial banks cannot cover a supply shortage. In other words, the central bank prevents the country's banking system from failing. However, the primary goal of central banks is to provide their countries' currencies with price stability by controlling inflation (There is however lots of discussion about this purpose and whether central banks are actually creating stability or disrupting it). see: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/03/050703.asp for more info.

Not all central banks are creating money at the same pace though... The FED stopped it's QE-program, while the ECB for example is out in full force QE atm.

Central banks used to be constrained because their printed notes were convertible to gold, so they could only print so much notes as there was gold in their vaults. However, these constraints were totally taken away when Nixon closed the gold window in 1971. Actually the United States defaulted on their obligations then, they already printed way much more notes than were covered by their gold reserves. If Nixon didn't close the gold window, the gold reserves of the US would have been totally drained... more information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixon_shock

hope this helps, best regards

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  • $\begingroup$ OK, vote down all you want, but please, some feedback would be nice then... $\endgroup$ – tibo Jun 15 '16 at 19:39

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