1
$\begingroup$

This is just semantics, but MWG doesn't use the Weierstrass Theorem in its Math Appendix when using the fact that a continuous function always has a max value on any compact set.

Some books appeal directly to the Weierstrass Theorm.

Is there a right or wrong answer to this? Or is it more just, like I said, semantics?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Excuse me but what is your question? $\endgroup$ – Giskard Jun 29 '16 at 7:12
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ The Weierstrass Extreme Value Theorem guarantees this. However, it's used so frequently that economists take it for granted or omit it in graduate courses and research papers sometimes. MWG is a maturity book. Part of mathematical maturity is being able to fill in the details for a proof. $\endgroup$ – ml0105 Jun 29 '16 at 19:15
  • $\begingroup$ @ml0105, thank you for the comment, that was exactly what I was looking for. Somethings are obvious to some and not to others haha! $\endgroup$ – Frank Swanton Jul 1 '16 at 13:02
  • $\begingroup$ @ml0105, if you put that as answer, I will select it. This post will be useful to those who might been confused like me $\endgroup$ – Frank Swanton Jul 1 '16 at 13:04
  • $\begingroup$ I've made my comment an answer. :-) $\endgroup$ – ml0105 Jul 1 '16 at 14:56
2
$\begingroup$

The Weierstrass Extreme Value Theorem guarantees this. However, it's used so frequently that economists take it for granted or omit it in graduate courses and research papers. MWG is a maturity book. Part of mathematical maturity is being able to fill in the details for a proof.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.