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As a PhD student I made a few connections over the course of time with professors from around Europe (had brief chats with them at conferences, invited them at conferences, etc..). Some explicitly said, send me your paper once it is ready, other haven't.

Is it common in Economics to send your paper, without an explicit invitation, asking for feedback (assuming the speaker to be in the relevant field)? Or should one wait or look for a chance to present it in a seminar?

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    $\begingroup$ This question should probably be posted on academia SE $\endgroup$ – emeryville Dec 23 '16 at 15:16
  • $\begingroup$ I considered this, but I am interested specifically in the field of economics. $\endgroup$ – Three Diag Dec 23 '16 at 15:19
  • $\begingroup$ Academia SE is about all disciplines and this question is indeed on-topic there, off-topic here. $\endgroup$ – Alecos Papadopoulos Dec 24 '16 at 13:15
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Is it common in Economics to send your paper, without an explicit invitation, asking for feedback (assuming the speaker to be in the relevant field)?

I am not sure this is common in Econ but I have definitely done it! Note that you increase the probability of getting feedback if

  • you know or met the author,
  • he/she asked you to send your paper,
  • you cite their work.

Or should one wait or look for a chance to present it in a seminar?

This is probably your best chance to get feedback given that profs are very busy. A bunch of universities and associations organize PhD seminars, workshops, conferences or poster sessions. Look at inomics. You may also contact profs with the intention to present your work in their seminars.

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You should have a good chance of some interest in your paper if it is:

  1. high quality (i.e. well thought out and well-written)
  2. doesn't take too long to get its point across
  3. cognizant of other research (i.e. make sure your research is new and not a rehash of some existing papers)
  4. sent to people who will have an interest in it (i.e. not randomly sending it to just any old professors of economics)

I am not an academic but I sent a paper to the chair of my country's society for economics, and I was given the option to present it at their annual convention.

It's too presumptuous to send the paper in the first email, so I asked if there was any interest in my first email, and sent the paper in the second email. Not all professors will reply (some will be just too busy even if your paper is very interesting)

If you're genuinely contributing to the field, people will be interested in your work, but remember that they are probably time-poor, and there may not be anything in it for them, at least in the short term (if your paper is quite good, and you're happy to do so, you could offer them the opportunity to collaborate so they get their name on the final paper - this might be of enough value to them to consider your paper more seriously)

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