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I was wondering what software/libraries everyone uses to simulate games? For instance finding the Nash Equilibrium. I see that Gambit is a popular one, but I was wondering if there are any other good ones? (good=robust, reliable and not slow)

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  • $\begingroup$ I would also like to specify that I'm specifically looking to manipulate data programatically. $\endgroup$ – Axl Oct 18 '17 at 10:17
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Game theory explorer (GTE) offers a web-based solver that searches for Nash equilibria of the inputted games. Its documentation highlights the main differences between GTE and Gambit:

Gambit has been developed over the course of nearly 25 years and presents a library of solution algorithms, formats for storing games, ways to program the creation of games with the help of the Python programming language, and a GUI for creating game trees. It is open-source software that is free to use and that can be extended by anyone. Given the mature state of Gambit and the joint research interests and close contacts with its developers, it is clear that any improvements offered by GTE should eventually be integrated into Gambit.

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The main difference of GTE to Gambit is the provided access to the software and the user interface. In terms of access, Gambit needs to be downloaded and installed; it is offered on the main personal computing platforms Windows, Linux or Mac. Getting the program to run may require some patience and technical experience with software installations, which may present a “barrier to entry” for its use. In contrast, GTE is started in a web browser via the web address http://www.gametheoryexplorer.org. All interaction with the software is via the browser interface. The created games and their output can be saved as files by the user on their local computer. This avoids the technical hurdles of installing software on the user side, and simplifies updating the software.

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I have used gambit (python) in the past and could recommend it. It also includes a small GUI which makes things very intuitive.

R also has GameTheory if you prefer this platform instead

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