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Until last year, the Chinese government set 8 percent annual growth as a goal, and the economy frequently delivered several percentage points more than that. Then last March, the government pared the goal to 7.5 percent, and actual growth seems likely to be little higher. “The potential growth rate of the economy has come down,” Stephen Green, a China economist in the Hong Kong offices of Standard Chartered, said Sunday. “You don’t have to be in the double digits to get inflation.” Prices rose faster in December, according to government data released Friday. Consumer prices rose 2.5 percent from the level of a year earlier, their fastest pace since May. China Again Is Growing, More Slowly

Hi, I read this article and I do not understand what "be in the double digits" means here. Could you please help me? Thank you.

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Economists believe that higher growth rates tend to also mean higher inflation rates.

So in this case what Mr. Green means is that

You don't need a GDP growth rate of over 10% to get inflation. (Even GDP growth of 7.5% or 8% will be enough for the return of high inflation.)

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  • $\begingroup$ as a complement, it would be nice to say a bit more about how GDP growth translates into inflation $\endgroup$
    – emeryville
    Mar 22 '18 at 7:39

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