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I'm looking for economic data on China's main sectors (output, factor prices etc). I haven't really seen anything with a long sample -- with the possible exception of Cheremukhin/Golosov/Guriev/Tsyvinski (2015). The Economy of People’s Republic of China from 1953.

Does anyone know if there are any good sources available? thanks.

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Good data sources from China are hard to come by. For official data, you can find nearly all available data series through the company called CEIC, although this is somewhat expensive. In general, the history of many of these series doesn't go very far back either, since it is only in the last decade or two that China has really become serious about collecting economic data. If you want something that goes back to before 1990 or so, there are perhaps academic sources that do this (I don't know them), though this data will probably be based on very rough estimates in that case.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you give some details about CEIC, such as a website? Is there any good reference using it? $\endgroup$ – emeryville Mar 25 '18 at 18:52
  • $\begingroup$ Does the CEIC data contain any more than the (free) official data from the National Bureau of Statistics of China, available here for 1996ff? $\endgroup$ – Adam Bailey Mar 25 '18 at 18:54
  • $\begingroup$ The website of CEIC can be found here: ceicdata.com/en $\endgroup$ – oager Mar 25 '18 at 19:09
  • $\begingroup$ They have literally millions of data series on China, from various official and proprietary sources, so yes, there is a lot more - though perhaps only very little of it will be relevant to you. $\endgroup$ – oager Mar 25 '18 at 19:10
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If you check data.workdbank.org, then go to the "databank", you can select "World Development Indicators" (WDIs).

Then you can select China, and searching for "value added" within your browser you can get a variety of measures of agriculture, manufacturing, services and industry (e.g., % of GDP, in USD). The time series goes back long before 1990.

Even if not disaggregated enough for what you want to do, it could be useful as a point of comparison.

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