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$f(x_1,x_2) = min \{x_1,x_2\} + x_2$ if that was the production, what would the isoquant be? Would it simply follow $x_1 = x_2$? I'm not entirely sure what it the graph would look like.

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    $\begingroup$ Voting to close as this appears to be a homework question and no effort has been put into explaining attempts to solve it. $\endgroup$ – TheSaint321 Apr 25 '18 at 14:13
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$f(x_1,x_2) = \min(x_1,x_2) + x_2 = \begin{cases} x_1 + x_2 & \text{if } x_1 \leq x_2 \\ 2x_2 & \text{if } x_1 > x_2 \end{cases}$

Here is the isoquant map for the production function : enter image description here

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An isoquant is a contour line drawn through the set of points at which the same quantity of output is produced while changing the quantities of two or more inputs.

Having production function: $f(x_1, x_2) = min \{x_1, x_2 \} + x_2$ for $x_i \in [1, 10]$

We can produce isoquants for varying number of inputs. Below you will find 10 isoquants for quantities ranging from 1 to 10 (keep in mind that $Q = 1$ and $Q = 2$ are overlapping). I hope it helps to visualize the problem.

enter image description here

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