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I see the term “entry price” and “price entry system” in relation to tariffs.

What do these means?

For example this document: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/10095/1/sp06go22.pdf

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Entry price system (EPS) is a EU-specific term relating to their food import tariffs, more specifically to fruits and vegetables. It's a somewhat complicated system designed to strongly discourage imports below a certain price. This is a summary from 2009 paper:

The EU protects growers of 15 kinds of selected fruits and vegetables against international competition not only by the means of ad valorem tariffs of up to 20%, but also by the EPS. The EPS came into effect on 1 July 1995, replacing the former RPS. Analogous to a minimum import price, the EPS is designed to restrict imports below the product-specific, politically designated EP plus ad valorem tariff (Table 1). If the EP is undercut, an additional specific tariff is levied, which proportionally varies depending on the gap between the product’s actual import price and the EP. When the EP is undercut by 8% or more, the maximum specific tariff, referred to as the maximum tariff equivalent (MTE), of up to 80% of the EP is charged. For example, the EPS is applied to oranges during the EU orange harvest season in the time period December 1 to May 31. The MFN tariff for oranges seasonally varies between 3.2% and 16.0% whereas the MFN EP remains constant at a level of 354 €/t. If oranges are exported to the EU at a price of 336.3 €/t, the EP is undercut by 5%. This implies that the exporter has to pay an additional specific tariff of 17.7 €/t which is equal to the gap between the import price and the EP. If the entry price for oranges is undercut by 8% or more, an additional specific tariff at the level of the MTE of 71 €/t is charged. [...]

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Monitoring compliance with the EPS faces the difficulty that a large share of fruit and vegetable imports in the EU is on commission, implying that the import price is not determined until the product is sold in the EU market. Therefore, the EC calculates a synthetic import price, the standard import value (SIV). Fruit and vegetable prices, surveyed for each product and export country individually, are collected on representative fruit and vegetable wholesale markets in all EU Member States. The daily SIVs are calculated as a weighted average of collected wholesale market prices, less a marketing and transportation margin and applied tariffs. The EPS can be circumvented (both legally and illegally), so that some product is finally sold at prices below the EP (García-Álvarez-Coque, 2002). According to information from importers, illegal circumvention (e.g. based on false invoicing) is more prevalent in small-scale trading, particularly between related trading partners. Storage can offer a means of legal circumvention, as storable products can be imported at any time while customs clearance is delayed until some later date when the SIV is above the EP. Once cleared at a favourable SIV, the product can be sold later on EU markets at any price (Cioffi and del' Aquila, 2004).

There were some 2014 changes (not covered in that quote).

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