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As in title, I'm looking for a paper estimating the amount of all money in the world, sum of value of all national currencies or something like this.

When I google it, I find only pop-science curiosities, but I need hard data to quote.

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If you're looking for total value of banknotes and coins in circulation, then the Bank for International Settlements provides some useful statistics. While the BIS only collects data on ~20 countries including the EU, the noted countries cover almost all of the value of banknotes and coins in circulation as of now. At the end of 2017, the total amount in USD is $6.458 trillion.

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And if you're looking for broad money (which basically includes bank accounts as well), the World Bank puts it at about 125% of the world's GDP. It has been increasing fairly rapidly over the past decades; it was only around 50% in the 1960s.

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Broad money (IFS line 35L..ZK) is the sum of currency outside banks; demand deposits other than those of the central government; the time, savings, and foreign currency deposits of resident sectors other than the central government; bank and traveler’s checks; and other securities such as certificates of deposit and commercial paper.

The world's GDP in 2018 was almost \$86 trillion (nominal, World Bank data), which puts the (broad) money supply at around \$107 trillion in the same year. A more exact calculation is $1.24734 \times 85.804 = 107.027$ trillion. There's a lot money in the bank accounts than there is physical currency in circulation.

As a sanity check, MarketWatch puts the broad money in the world at $90.4 trillion for 2017. The estimate is in the same ballpark as the one I made above. (Marketwatch does not cite a source for their data.) It does have more interesting comparisons though, including with the world real estate, stocks, and with derivatives (also with bitcoin if you care [to be amused]).

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