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When I think about the eurozone countires in terms of governments economical prudence I, as many, divide them into the northern prudent(Nordic+ Germany) and the less prudent southern(Grecce, Italy, Spain).

What is France place in such a division? Is Macron trying to make France resemble the north?

I am aware that this is a very broad question and the assumptions are very crude, but any feedback would be great.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well what is prudent or not is very opinion based (hence I vote to close) unless you want to put some measure on it it’s not possible to answer this. For example many economists would agree that Germany’s push for debt reduction even when it can borrow at 0 or negative interest rate is imprudent. In that terms France would be more economically prudent. When it comes labor market policies Germany is usually held as a positive example while France not so much. Public perception of economic prudence can also depend on non-economic factors. I don’t know of any economic prudence index... $\endgroup$ – 1muflon1 Jan 19 at 10:25
  • $\begingroup$ @1muflon1 right, but dont worry about prudence and just take the question as in which of the two groups does France belong with respect to macroeconomical characteristics and philosophy of goverment spending and saving. $\endgroup$ – user1 Jan 19 at 12:23
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    $\begingroup$ but how do you define the two groups? First philosophy here is off topic so we can skip that. But macroeconomic characteristics would be on topic but how do you define the groups? What should the inflation, unemployment GDP growth, interest rates, gov spending, consumption, savings rate etc be for a country to qualify in one group or another? My whole point is that these groups are not defined in economics so they can’t be answered in terms of economics. You can ask for people’s opinion but then this is not right page for that as opinion based questions are off topic here $\endgroup$ – 1muflon1 Jan 19 at 13:10
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France, under the leadership of Emanuel Macron, has been trying to lessen it’s dependence on tourism as a main national income, and has been trying to strengthen it’s chemical industry and manufacturing industry. That’s because tourism depends upon economical and national stability, in case of a conflict on French lands, tourists will not be attracted and will be discouraged from going to these areas, therefore, nullifying the national income . Chemical and manufacturing industries on the other hand, would be unaffected because the control of these industries is in the of capitalist or the government. Chemical and manufacturing industries are involved in every sector of every economy on planet earth, from food and water, cleaning products, medicine, to rocketry and nuclear reactors, all these are built upon chemical and manufacturing industries.

Summary: 1- A national driven economic income (chemical and manufacturing industries) is more stable and profitable than depending on foreign income(tourism) 2-France is following the path of Germany in shaping it’s industry and source of income. 3- France is not on the same level of economy as Germany, but it’s getting there.

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    $\begingroup$ (-1) This does not answer the question - which not about industrial policy but fiscal prudence - at all. Also your first point implies that Luxembourg is an extremely poor country, as it has a very small inner market. $\endgroup$ – Giskard Jan 20 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Giskard will my dear gentleman, No. Luxembourg is a country where Steel industry and business is dominant by contribution to the national economy. Much of Luxembourg’s citizens live outside Luxembourg, they live in Germany, France, U.K, and the U.S, they conduct much of their business there. And as I speculate from looking at my answer, I think it does answer your question, France is following the economy of Germany and nordic countries. $\endgroup$ – Noor Jan 20 at 15:32
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    $\begingroup$ You are mistaken, sir/madam! Industry is but a small part of Luxembourg's GDP. Also, I am not the one who posted the question. I find the other parts of your comment to be unrelated to topic - again. $\endgroup$ – Giskard Jan 20 at 16:58

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