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According to the Deloitte report published here, a connected worker is defined as someone whose working life is changing due to digital and other technologies. This is due to advancement of technologies, such as, smart wearables, IoTs, Industry 4.0 etc, therefore, enabling the worker to work from anywhere and anytime. This implies that due to these technologies, the geographical and temporal boundaries are becoming less relevant.

Is there any perspectives that we can use from the Economics literature to understand the concept of connected workers?

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    $\begingroup$ a connected worker is defined as someone whose working life is changing due to digital and other technologies -- so, just about everybody? $\endgroup$
    – user18
    Jul 8, 2020 at 4:36
  • $\begingroup$ @1muflon1 here is the report www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/tr/Documents/… $\endgroup$ Jul 8, 2020 at 16:20
  • $\begingroup$ @1muflon1 okay I have done this now. $\endgroup$ Jul 8, 2020 at 16:27
  • $\begingroup$ However, human beings are embodied creatures who do live in physical space. So the physical cannot be ignored (and nor should it). $\endgroup$ Jul 8, 2020 at 17:15
  • $\begingroup$ Can you point out where in the report it says the physical is 'becoming less relevant'? I've quickly glanced through the report and there is no such claim. $\endgroup$ Jul 8, 2020 at 17:44

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You may look up the 2015 Journal of Economic Perspective paper "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation" by David Autor. Look up the references therein.

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  • $\begingroup$ -1: This isn't an answer. $\endgroup$ Jul 8, 2020 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ @MoziburUllah. This is a bit harsh. The paper is written by a well-known economist at MIT and utilises the concept of complementarity, which, in turn, can be used to understand the concept of connected workers. $\endgroup$ Jul 8, 2020 at 19:15

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