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I understand that rarity increases price, and that maximum profit may not be to sell every car you can but still the production of supercars looks weird to me. T.50 production will be 100. Allegedly they sold most of them already. Ferrari Enzo(quoting Wikipedia):

The company sent invitations to existing customers, specifically, those who had previously bought the F40 and F50. All 399 cars were sold in this way before production began.

It seems that in both cases manufacturers could sell much more cars than they choose to do(without reducing the price)

So is there a well know economical reason for this strategy(assuming car manufacturers are not lying about the demand).

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    $\begingroup$ "It seems that in both cases manufacturers could sell much more cars than they choose to do(without reducing the price)" Can you back this up? Otherwise this seems like idle speculation. $\endgroup$
    – Giskard
    Aug 14 '20 at 22:26
  • $\begingroup$ I am partly guessing here, but this is not a mass produced car. They are custom designed and built, like formula 1 cars. The production run probably reflects what a small team can put together, without trying to have to find more people with highly specialised skills. They can’t afford having key people quit because they are being overworked. $\endgroup$ Aug 15 '20 at 0:36

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