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do you know any (theoretical or empirical) recent famous paper about monetary unions ? I heard that topics like "monetary unions at ZLB" or "fiscal coordination during crisis time" are quite popular these days.

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    $\begingroup$ Not sure whether “famous” is the word to use. If it were famous, you would already know about it. If you want a recent paper, there are various search engines. (I use Google Scholar, but I’m only a casual user.) $\endgroup$ – Brian Romanchuk Sep 17 '20 at 15:39
  • $\begingroup$ How do you define ‘famous paper’? Also what do you consider ‘recent’? ZLB has been subject of research interest for almost half of a century. $\endgroup$ – 1muflon1 Sep 17 '20 at 15:39
  • $\begingroup$ Famous= with a lot of citation $\endgroup$ – user28453 Sep 17 '20 at 17:46
  • $\begingroup$ No I'm not aware of all papers even if they are famous $\endgroup$ – user28453 Sep 17 '20 at 17:46
  • $\begingroup$ I know Google Scholar. You are not helping me at all. $\endgroup$ – user28453 Sep 17 '20 at 17:47
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Get a copy of De Grauwe's "Economics of Monetary Union". The most recent version (13th edition) is quite recent, from this year. So if there is a "famous" recent paper, it is discussed in there. The book is certainly more guided than searching for recent papers that cite Robert Mundell.

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My original answer did not point to a recent "famous" paper so this is an edit. One recent paper that looks interesting, but probably is not "famous", relates to the subject of rollover risk in a currency region. The title is "Coordination and Crisis in Monetary Unions". This can be discovered via keyword search. I do not know how one would find recent "famous" papers except to keyword search the most popular and highly respected economic journals.

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