1
$\begingroup$

What textbook(s) (and other resources) would you recommend to someone who wants to self-study microeconomics to an advanced (graduate) level starting from 0 (i.e. no formal background in economics)?

I have an undergraduate double major in a humanity and natural science. So there is a base of mathematical ability and knowledge of calc. I plan on improving in this area as well, so it isn't essential that all the requisite math is covered, but accessibility without a lack of rigor is of course preferred.

$\endgroup$
10
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ This seems to be duplicate of this or this question, do answers there answer your question? If not why? $\endgroup$
    – 1muflon1
    Apr 8 at 18:33
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ I would not recommend MWG - as the first and only - if you plan to self-study and have no background in economics. The book largely assumes that the student is familiar with basic intuitions and concepts of economic theory and rephrases these on more solid and abstract mathematical grounds. By all means read it but I think you will use your time more efficiently by not depending solely on that book given your description of your background. $\endgroup$ Apr 8 at 18:55
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @asd7 actually no they do not, especially MWG starts from the first principles. I disagree with Jasper not recommending it. Yes MWG will have some jargon that you might not be familiar with it but if you pair MWG with any undergraduate textbook and just switch from MWG to undergrad textbook whenever you need a term to be explained you will do fine $\endgroup$
    – 1muflon1
    Apr 8 at 20:03
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ @asd7 as 1muflon1 says MWG starts from first principles but these are still presented in a fashion consistent with the goal of the book which is "to serve as a first year graduate book" - so the book are most certainly intended for readers previously exposed to economic theory. That is why I recommend you not to use it as your only source. $\endgroup$ Apr 8 at 20:57
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I am in agreement with Jesper. I can't think of another subject matter where we would recommend a Ph.D. level text to someone wishing to learn the subject matter. $\endgroup$
    – EB3112
    Apr 8 at 22:31
2
$\begingroup$

A good balance of intuition and rigour is given by a text called Chicago Price Theory and an accompanying YouTube series from Chicago Economics Dept.

https://home.uchicago.edu/cbm4/cpt/index.html

My only criticism of the YouTube series would be that the ordering of the videos is very poor. It would therefore require simultaneously consulting the text.

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I will give it a try. $\endgroup$
    – asd7
    Apr 8 at 19:56
  • $\begingroup$ No problem. Hope it is somewhat helpful. $\endgroup$
    – EB3112
    Apr 8 at 20:07
0
$\begingroup$

I like Besanko, because he provides a lot of examples and good practice problems. I have used this textbook and referred it to a lot of the people I tutor. Below is the 5th edition in pdf.

https://economics-pr.weebly.com/uploads/4/8/6/0/48608947/microeconomics-david_besanko_ronald_braeutigam-wiley____2013__zzz.pdf

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.