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I am first year economics student and for the past month we have had it constantly drilled into us that all choices have an opportunity cost and thus they are all necessitated by scarcity. Thus when I saw this quesiton in my homework I was baffled.

I don't need an exact answer to this, but a hint would be great. My current line of thinking is leaning towards infinite resources like the sun, but I simply can't work it out. Thanks.

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The basic idea behind scarcity and opportunity cost is fundamental to economics. Basically, if resources are infinite, you have everything.

In my opinion, there are no infinite resources because a lifetime is finite. In one way or another, it can be argued all choices are necessitated by scarcity.

Eating chips means at that time, you cant be eating a burger. That is your opportunity cost.

This may be the point of your homework question, to make you realise that scarcity is a key driving force behind decision making.

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    $\begingroup$ Even if a lifetime is infinite, your capacity to do something in a unit time is finite! $\endgroup$ – serakfalcon Feb 26 '15 at 2:48
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Whenever you choose something, you choose against something else. If there was nothing to be lost, the choice would be trivial.

In other words, there is only no scarcity to choosing when there is no real choice.

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Choice to ignore, or to upvote, or to downvote a social media post, or a question on, say, stackexchange, is not necessitated by scarcity.

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