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It is known that chess is a game of perfect information as all the possible moves as well as the first moves are known to all the players, but is it a game of complete information? We know the final payoff of the game but not for every sequential move. Would it still be considered to have complete information?

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From a Wikipedia page linked to in the question: [emphasis by me]

Examples of games with incomplete but perfect information are conceptually more difficult to imagine, such as a Bayesian game. The board game Ticket to Ride is one example, where players' resources and moves are known to all, but their objectives (which routes they seek to complete) are hidden. A game of chess is a commonly given example to illustrate how the lack of certain information influences the game, without chess itself being such a game. One can readily observe all of the opponent's moves and viable strategies available to them but never ascertain which one the opponent is following until this might prove disastrous for one. Games with perfect information generally require one player to outwit the other by making them misinterpret one's decisions.

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