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I am aware that the methods used to assess land value of properties, used by government agencies for taxation, are affected by zoning restrictions. Restrictions on how a lot of land may be used by it's owner naturally affects it's worth. These methods can determine how much money a land value tax can extract from a lot if we allow the owner to change, but assume that the current zoning restrictions remain.

But can any known method be used to determine land value independently of the current zoning? Is there a method that removes the assumption that the current zoning remains?

Would this be as simple as removing a step from the current assessment methods? Or do these methods rely on data that is inherently tied to the current zoning context?

I would prefer if this method can be applied to land that is not currently privately-owned.

I have been developing a system to distribute land value tax revenue to multiple administrative levels of government. The formulae I created require a zoning-independent measure of land value to be known as it's used to determine how much of a city's revenue it gets to keep.

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If there are some cities with no zoning you can estimate the value of zoning restrictions using the hedonic method. Afterwards you can just subtract that value from property.

However, doing so will not be possible if every single municipality has the same zoning restriction. You need at least some variation between different places to be able to estimate it.

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