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I am a beginner in microeconomics. I do not understand the supply curve at all.

Supply curve of what?

Is there a supply curve for each product? For example, is there the supply curve of "iPhone 15 Pro White Titanium 1TB"?

If so, it is strange that the supply curve is monotonically increasing. I would expect higher prices to be sold in smaller quantities and lower prices in larger quantities.

Or is there a supply curve for each category? For example, is there the supply curve of smartphones?

If so, I don't see what significance "equilibrium prices" have. There are many different products on the market at many different prices. They do not, and should not, converge to an equilibrium price. It is good to have expensive high-end models and inexpensive low-end models.

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  • $\begingroup$ Feel free to discuss this with your lecturer. If they are worth their salt, they will be happy that you want to have a better understanding and will answer your questions. $\endgroup$
    – Giskard
    Commented Feb 15 at 9:58

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Is there a supply curve for each product?

Yes.

If so, it is strange that the supply curve is monotonically increasing. I would expect higher prices to be sold in smaller quantities and lower prices in larger quantities.

This is a bit ambigously worded, but it seems you misunderstand what the supply curve shows. The supply curve shows given a price $p$, how many units of the good would be offered on the market. It is unlikely that someone who is unwilling to sell at a high price level would be willing to sell at a lower price level; do they not like money? Hence monotonicity is a decent assumption.

Or is there a supply curve for each category?

They do aggregate goods sometimes, especially in macroeconomics, but in micro you can think that a supply curve is for a specific type of good.

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