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Recently, some countries have experienced hyperinflation such as Lebanon, Zimbabwe, and Venezuela.

Has there ever been a time when a government defaulted on its treasure bond payments due to a country's economic state, such as hyperinflation, or for some national or international political issue? By default, I mean failing to pay local and international treasury bondholders.

When Lebanon prevented Lebanese citizens from withdrawing their money from banks, did it also stop paying its government bonds?

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Has there ever been a time when a government defaulted on its due to a country's economic state, such as hyperinflation, or for some national or international political issue?

Yes, since default leads to increased cost of borrowing and often also to capital flight, and host of other economic issues, countries do not default on their debt just for fun but only when they are in economic difficulties. Hyperinflation, is often a way how countries try to avoid default but when country decides that cost of hyperinflation is worse than cost of default it might decide to default.

Here are some examples of countries defaulting from Reinhart and Rogoff 2011:

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When Lebanon prevented Lebanese citizens from withdrawing their money from banks, did it also stop paying its government bonds?

Lebanon did default on their Eurobond on 9 March 2020. Lebanon started with capital controls on 2019 so it did not happened at the same time, however, capital controls are typical instrument governments close to default implement to prevent capital flight.

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