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I have undergraduate level experience in macroeconomics...but I want to do some further learning to try and acquaint myself with where mainstream macroeconomics is at the moment in the hopes that I can understand the economy better. I understand that most macroeconomics is highly mathematical at this stage and I have no problem with this, but a more intuitive/wordy/theoretical approach would be preferred.

Are there any good online lecture notes, textbooks etc. for this sort of thing?

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A good site, with high quality online lectures, is the MIT Open Course Ware.

You will find courses going from Principles of Macroeconomics, Economic Growth, Macroeconomic Theory I, II, III to Advanced Macroeconomics I or II.

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A good book at the high undergrad/low graduate level is the classic Romer text:

http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Macroeconomics-Mcgraw-Hill-Series-Economics/dp/0073511374

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    $\begingroup$ I think the sites policy on recommendation type questions is to post one book per answer. Would you mind posting this as two answers? This way it allows people to independently vote on each recommendation: See meta.economics.stackexchange.com/questions/169/… $\endgroup$ – cc7768 Dec 8 '15 at 15:12
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A lot of macro nowadays (at least for the past couple of decades) is based on DSGE models. These models recognize the dynamic nature of agents' decisions. A standard approach to solving such problems relies on dynamic programming. My personal favorite to understand dynamic programming and its applications can be found in the Sargent and Ljungqvist booK:

http://www.amazon.com/Recursive-Macroeconomic-Theory-Lars-Ljungqvist/dp/026212274X

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There are quite a few books out there, but I found the following books explain the concepts and tools more intutitively: ABCs of RBCs and Economic Growth, maybe then go on to read others.

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The Khan Academy video series on macro is excellent. They focus on the most important concepts and the diagrams in the videos will really help with comprehension. https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics

Also, Investopedia's articles and definitions are always very well written. They are much more plain spoken and to the point then what you would find on Wikipedia.

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If you want a thorough, broad and incredibly well done videos series on the internet, there is no way around MR University (from the editors of the mostread economics blog: Marginal Revolution) http://www.mruniversity.com/

The level is very basic, but it gives a very, very good intuiton on every topic.

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