1
$\begingroup$

I'm doing a research paper about how different cities have different quality of police service. I want to do a regression where the dependent variable is number of sustained complaints per 10 officers that year received by that agency. But maybe there is a better measure. I want to avoid using crime as a measure of police quality though, because I think crime is only partly affected by police service in the area.

Anyway, the thing I need to do first of all is get an idea of other work people have done in this area. And this area to me would be analyzing markets for public police, analyzing police service quality, analyzing demand for police service and whether it relates to quality of police service- same with supply, analyzing changes in police force for different cities, identifying factors that improve/diminish city-wide quality of police service.

Could someone suggest articles about measuring the quality of police service in a city? Or equilibrium quantity of police service in a city? Or things related to what I want to research? Especially if they do not focus on crime?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

I found these articles about measuring the quality of service of a police department:

Chen, Chien Min et al. 2013. The police service quality in rural Taiwan. Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management 37 no. 3:521-542.

Editorial Desk. 1983. A Better Report Card for the Police. The New York Times (Late City Final Edition), February 11.

Slothower, Mary, Peter Neyroud, Lawrence W. Sherman. 2015. Tracking Quality of Police Actions in a Victim Contact Program: A Case Study of Training, Tracking, and Feedback (TTF) in Evidence-Based Policing. International Criminal Justice Review 25 no. 1:98-116.

Then I found this about productivity and trust.Sort of has to do with supply side, and a little about the quality of service.

Brown, Sarah et al. 2015. Employee trust and workplace performance. Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 116 (August): 361-378.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

One of the classic papers on the supply of (and demand for) policing is Steven Levitt's "Using Electoral Cycles in Police Hiring to Estimate the Effects of Police on Crime", which finds that hiring more police does in fact reduce crime, and which does so in a way that avoids the endogeneity (more crime often leads to more police being hired) that makes this a difficult problem. This original paper was found by Justin McCrary to have issues in coding and specification, but Levitt argued in a response that many of the original findings stand.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy