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Results tagged with Search options user 42

Questions about self-studying economics, including curriculum design, study strategies, resources, etc.

4
votes
Seminars and conferences are the best ways to get exposure to working papers, in addition to following specific authors. (Some of my colleagues also follow economists on Twitter, where they sometimes …
answered May 5 by Herr K.
3
votes
Another way of looking at this problem is to consider the means and variances of the lotteries. A risk averse agent (RA) likes high mean and low variance A risk neutral agent (RN) likes high mean …
answered Jan 23 '18 by Herr K.
2
votes
Most of what you have done was correct. Here are the steps to finish the argument. Evaluating the profits at the optimum, you get \begin{equation} \pi_G=R(y^*(t))-C(y^*(t)) \quad\text{and}\quad \p …
answered Apr 28 '18 by Herr K.
0
votes
Modeling the game as four separate matrices does not capture the fact that each general knows his army strength but not the strength of the other army. Given the small action space, it may help if y …
answered Mar 27 by Herr K.
1
vote
I would suggest the Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics. It currently has 5 volumes and collects papers on the theories and empirics of urban/city design. Selected chapters that may potentially a …
answered Mar 1 by Herr K.
1
vote
You're asked to prove that $u(x)\ge u(y)\;\Leftrightarrow\;x\succsim y$ for any $x,y\in X$, where $u(x)=|\{z\in X:z\prec x\}|$, i.e. the utility of $x$ is measured by the number of other alternatives …
answered Oct 10 '18 by Herr K.
1
vote
Is this like taxing the demand vs taxing the supply? Yes. Taxing consumers reduces their willingness to pay. Therefore demand curve shifts down. Taxing producers raises their cost of productio …
answered Mar 2 '18 by Herr K.
3
votes
Consider: Proposer offers $0$ Receiver always rejects the offer regardless of the amount You should be able to argue that this is a pair of mutually best responding strategies for $T=1$. The $T> …
answered Feb 27 by Herr K.
6
votes
Hidden information concerns characteristics that are unobservable by one side of the market. For example, a consumer's willingness to pay, a worker's productivity, the quality of a used car all fall u …
answered Mar 13 '18 by Herr K.
2
votes
Coalition formation is not the same as majority voting. Say, in a single good economy, individual 1 has the entire endowment, so $\mathbf e=(1,0,0,0,0,0)$. Then individual 1 forms a blocking coalition …
answered Nov 13 '18 by Herr K.
1
vote
I don't have a copy of Gibbons handy, so I cannot speak to the specific model presented there, but only generally. The intuition of the conclusion is based on the combination of the following factors: …
answered Apr 11 by Herr K.