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Refers to compulsory or coercive money collection by a levying authority, usually a government. The term "taxation" applies to all types of involuntary levies, from income to capital gains to estate taxes. Though taxation can be a noun or verb, it is usually referred to as an act; the resulting revenue is usually called "taxes."

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For your first question, it is hard to say whether your graphs are valid, as you are more or less assuming random functional forms. More accurate graphs would derive the functions based on utility max …
answered May 11 '18 by BB King
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The classification of direct vs indirect taxes is outdated and has nothing to do with the effects of taxes on behaviour. This classification is mostly due to historic reasons. Direct taxes are taxes …
answered Aug 11 '17 by BB King
4
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0answers
be interesting. I remember reading somewhere that combining taxes and subsidies used to be a real policy proposal in order to have taxation without distortion until a paper came along showing that such a policy cannot raise revenue. Unfortunately, I can't remember where I read that. …
asked Apr 28 '18 by BB King
1
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The answer by @NickCHK is very good and the derivation is correct for quantity taxes. Nevertheless, let me clarify a few things. In the comments you give a counterexample to this formula and state tha …
answered Oct 15 '18 by BB King
7
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The burden of taxation is shared among suppliers and demanders according to the price elasticities of supply and demand. The more elastic side carries less of the tax burden. To understand this …
answered Jul 13 '16 by BB King
3
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There are two main reason for the difference in tax rates that I see from the literature. First, some papers argue that the optimal tax rate on capital is zero. This is the famous "Chamley-Judd" resu …
answered Aug 11 '17 by BB King
1
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The reason you have trouble with that normal graph is beacause it contradicts your premise. Therefore, you can't use it. I assume you mean the real burden (incidence) is passed on 100% to the consume …
answered Oct 28 '16 by BB King
2
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You can't create something from nothing. When the government prints money, that's really just colored paper. Printed money, in case production has not increased, will make money lose value. When the g …
answered Mar 14 '16 by BB King
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There is theoretical work on the matter in general. In fact, many standard models of optimal consumption taxation will typically yield a distortion that is increasing and convex in the rate of … taxation. This means that increasing a tax on a good from 5% to 6% results in higher distortion than increasing it from 2% to 3%. Following this logic, it is better to tax many goods at a low rate than to …
answered Oct 12 '15 by BB King