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Inflation is generalized increase of prices of goods and services in an economy, along with a corresponding fall in the purchasing value of money. The rate of inflation refers to the increase of the price of goods and services over time.

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There were plenty of relatively large purchases that were regular enough to buy with large amounts of cash. If you wanted to buy a Model T in 1909 you'd need \$825-\$1000. A typical house could easily …
answered May 24 '15 by BKay
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No, a deflator greater than 100 means that the price level is higher than in the base year. It doesn't mean that inflation is still occurring. In fact, you could be experiencing deflation after a … period of inflation and if prices today are still higher than the base year, have the deflator be above 100. A growing deflator is an indication of inflation. To detect inflation acceleration you'd need to see changes in the log(deflator) growing over time. …
answered Apr 22 '15 by BKay
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The CPI stands for a Consumer Price Index. As in the price of things that are consumed (at a particular moment in time). Real estate prices are not the price of something consumed because they contain …
answered Mar 19 '15 by BKay
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the Weimar inflation), they are actually quite different. Under QE asset purchases are usually expected to be temporary and accumulated assets (money) ultimately resold (returned in exchange for … monetary policy tools like changing the federal funds rate are (thought to be) ineffective. Many African countries are poor candidates for QE because they have pegged currencies, participate in a currency union, or have high inflation. Relentless Inflation: The Scourge Returns …
answered May 13 '15 by BKay
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conduct economic research. Also take a look at PriceStats PriceStats collects online prices to provide daily inflation updates for 22 economies. Overview of the PiceStats approach More …
answered Jan 20 '16 by BKay
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In general, real output is calculated like this: $$RGDP_{t, b} = NGDP_t \cdot p_{base} / p_t$$ Where $NGDP_t$ is nominal GDP at time t, $p_t$ is the price level in time $t$ and $p_{base}$ is the pric …
answered May 10 '15 by BKay
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The Billion Price Project offers what you want: Daily price indices, monthly, and annual inflation rates for Argentina and the US. Monthly data with annual inflation rates for Argentina … fluctuate enough for daily inflation to be very different from assuming a constant inflation (which is roughly equivalent to using the average). I estimate, using the calculations above, that …
answered Aug 3 '18 by BKay
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CPI is a stock while GDP is a flow. Re-sampling of stocks to higher frequencies can be approximated with a number of choices, but probably the most common is linear interpolation. In some contexts fil …
answered Jan 4 by BKay
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The strongest story I hear for the benefits of inflation is from undoing the nominal rigidities that make it difficult for some prices to adjust down. The most important of these rigidities is … rigidities in wages are. For example: Inflation, Nominal Wage Rigidity, and the Efficiency of Labor Markets If nominal wages cannot fall, then positive inflation may facilitate real wage …
answered Feb 10 '15 by BKay
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approach, which can be shown to be present only in some models. From a welfare point of view, the model implies that it is desirable to stabilize inflation and to stabilize the output gap. Equation … (1) implies that the two goals do not conflict: Stabilizing inflation also stabilizes the output gap. Thus, for example, in response to an increase in the price of oil, the best policy is to …
answered Apr 1 by BKay
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that "Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon." While it may not be an iron law, there does seem to be good evidence that when the money supply increases prices are likely to go up … after. Is inflation always a monetary phenomenon? Many economists believe that the link between money growth and inflation in the U.S. has weakened over the last two decades due in part to the …
answered Oct 9 '15 by BKay
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seem to be some contrary evidence more recently like Inflation May Hit the Poor Hardest (Casselman (2014)). …
answered Jun 6 by BKay
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Yes, but only if you also introduce capital controls. You should check out the Mundell–Fleming trilemma: The Impossible trinity (also known as the Trilemma) is a trilemma in international econom …
answered Sep 20 '16 by BKay