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The proportion of an amount loaned which a lender charges as interest to the borrower, normally expressed as an annual percentage. The interest rate is typically determined by a combination of market forces and monetary policy.

5
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Great set of questions! Here are some ideas: What it is?: An investment that pays the investor a negative interest rate is one where he or she pays X money upfront, and receives $X\cdot(1+r)$ later …
answered Mar 10 '16 by Fix.B.
3
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Good question! It seems that one of the reasons was precisely that inflation did not respond. They kept raising interest rates, hoping it would respond at some point. In fact, nominal interest rate …
answered Apr 23 '16 by Fix.B.
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Yes, in principle, under a gold standard, the central bank can buy more gold, or build a mine and mine it, which increases money supply. This lowers the short run interest rates. But the issue is …
answered Apr 23 '16 by Fix.B.
3
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Good question! But difficult to answer. A) Typically, economists think of most interest rates as being set by markets. Under that assumption, you can't change rates by themselves because the market w …
answered Apr 5 '16 by Fix.B.
1
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For interest rates, the theory(spelled out as the Fisher equation) is that there are two components to the nominal interest rate. These are the real interest rate and the expected inflation. The real …
answered Mar 30 '16 by Fix.B.
1
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There are many possible monetary policy channels. These channels are the different ways that changes in the Fed's interest rates can affect the economy: exchange rate depreciations, business investmen …
asked Apr 26 '16 by Fix.B.