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The bottom of these indicator/series pages on FRED always lists the source. In this case, it's the OECD. If you dig around a bit on their site, and find where they host the data, there is always some meta-data attached to these that explains pretty much everything you would be looking for normally. Otherwise, they also list an email and you can ask them ...


2

A current account deficit is when a country imports more goods, services, and capital than it exports. The current account measures trade plus transfers of capital. https://www.thebalance.com/current-account-deficit-definition-components-and-causes-3305831 When a country imports goods, it has to pay for them. That means it moves money from the importing ...


2

Natural resources and gravity determines trade. How the balance of payments is settled is not really important. But there are a few possibilities a country has a lot of debt and defaults or refis it down to a very low rate to go negative indefinitely; foreign aid; moneyprinting that isn't adequately adjusted in foreign exchange; selling overpriced domestic ...


1

This can be visualized nicely by an example: Let’s say there are two islands in the world. And let’s just say island A only produces apples and island B only produces bananas. Also, the (real) exchange rate is one apple for one banana. Now, for whatever reason, island A exports 20 apples but imports 30 bananas (a trade deficit). It now owes goods of the ...


1

When an American buys a coffee within the US, how does that 3.50 dollars worth of consumption expenditure make it's way to the US GDP account? It would be personal consumption expenditures which primary data source is from the: BEA’s Benchmark Input-Output (IO) Accounts, which are based primarily on the Census Bureau’s Economic Censuses BEA’s ...


1

If OA is a part of FA. The second equation follows from the first: $CA + KA = FA \wedge OA \neq 0 \Rightarrow FA - OA = CA +KA -OA \neq CA +KA$. Response to your EDIT: $CA + KA \neq \frac{FA}{OA}$ follows from the first equation as well: $CA + KA = FA \wedge OA \neq 1 \Rightarrow \frac{FA}{OA}= \frac{CA+KA}{OA} \neq CA +KA$ in general. (I've checked your ...


1

The IMF Data, the UN Country Data or the World Bank Open Data should be good data sources covering a wide range of countries.


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The Balance of Payments are a form of double-entry bookkeeping and so in theory should always balance overall If official reserves do not change because the currency is floating freely and the Central Bank or Treasury is not intervenening, then a country's current account balance should be offset exactly by the financial/capital account balance. But ...


1

In note 1 of the World Investment Report 2017 (page 39), it is mentioned that FDI data may differ from one WIR issue to another as data are continually revised, updated and corrected by the responsible authorities, such as central banks and statistical offices, that provide FDI data to UNCTAD. The last figures are the most accurate ones.


1

Your statement "Portfolio Equity is about stocks/shares, whereas Portfolio Debt is about bonds" is essentially correct, with the associated income being dividends and coupons respectively Direct investment (FDI) has the associated income of profits, while other debts may have the associated income of interest (if any) Chapter 6 and other chapters of the ...


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You can think of the capital account as "exports of liabilities" - a capital account surplus means that a country is exporting liabilities (borrowing) from abroad to pay for imports of goods and services and/or for income transfers abroad (a current account deficit). An increase in foreign assets owned by the US is an import of liabilities: the US is buying ...


1

Russia has been ramping up its production of oil since late 1990s after it defaulted on its debt. It has been maintaining positive trade balance since then. Also, notice in the above graph, Russia has had current account surplus for a long time. It is somewhat similar to saying that Russia has been a net lender to the rest of the world. The current account ...


1

russia uses its oil revenue to setup russia stabilization fund in 2004. The money in that fund is used to pay for national budget deficit. The foreign exchange reserve of Bank of Russia is not affected by the US led sanctions.


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The ONS Balance of Payments Pink Book gives the following figures for UK exports to Ireland (£million). The figures in Euros would be different, as would Irish reporting of the numbers, but there seems to have been a sharp drop in services exports from 2012 to 2013. 2016 data is due to be published in October 2017, though trade in goods numbers may already ...


1

This answer starta out with how illegal transactions are normally treated in the national accounts. Transactions that are just attempts to evade currency controls are a special case, discussed later. If the illegal transaction was somehow measured, there would be two entries: the entry for the illegal good/service on the trade account, and the cash flow in ...


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The Balance of Payments is supposed to be a form of double-entry bookkeeping, in that every transaction has two opposite effects, often in different accounts. Hence the word balance. In fact it might be considered quadruple-entry bookkeeping, as there are another two effects on the foreign side too. For a country's Current Account to be in surplus there ...


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