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8

Start with: A primer in Social Choice Theory, by Wulf Gaertner. If you want more, have a look at: Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory by Allan Feldman and Roberto Serrano To dig deeper: Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare By A. Sen, Kotaro Suzumura Handbook of Social Choice and Voting by Jac C. Heckelman, Nicholas R. Miller Handbook of ...


6

It's great that you're developing an interest in economics. I would suggest Mankiw's Principles of Economics to start with. I believe it meets both your requirements and covers the two major areas of economics, microeconomics and macroeconomics, so you would get a decent overview of this field of study. Good luck!


4

All four of those books are widely used at the undergraduate level. They are written with the intention to be text-books of a class, so they should be good for self-study. I recommend you to read 1 and 2 before reading 3 and 4. Will give you a basic overview of the way we think in economics, clarify some basic concepts and explain work-horse models in the ...


4

Beyond Michel De Vroey's book, I know of no other book on the history of macroeconomics, as it is praised by macroeconomists. See for example this review. De Vroey has a true vision of macroeconomics, he shares it with his reader and gives clear guidelines to understand the developments in the field. Anyway, you will find below some nice references that ...


3

In the first category of books that are story-based and very well done, supported by academic research, I recommend the Freakonomics books by University of Chicago economist Steven Levitt and New York Times journalist Stephen J. Dubner. Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. SuperFreakonomics. The Freakonomics Blog with a ...


3

"The Art of Strategy: A Game Theorist's Guide to Success in Business and Life" By Dixit and Nalebuff. It's recommended by Steven Levitt so I guess it is fun. And also "Thinking, Fast and Slow" is a great book if you are interested on behavioral econ.


2

It’s the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP); manufacturers cannot dictate the final retail price. Any manufacturer that has a catalogue or a website has a suggested retail price. If retailers want to sell at a higher price, they just slap a price sticker over the MSRP. From what I recall, this was standard practice back in the 1970s-1980s, when ...


2

Macroeconomics is the part of interest to fixed income hedge funds, and a secondary concern for other parts of finance. It is also the area with the greatest theoretical splits. I am in the post-Keynesian economics camp. Within post-Keynesian economics, I would list two books as a good starting point. (I would guess that “mainstream” economists are in the ...


2

I am not going to recommend a book but a short paper by Avinash Dixit Prof at Princeton and published in the Journal of Education where it talks about restoring fun to game theory. He suggests using interactive games to be played in the classroom or in computer clusters, clips from movies to be screened and discussed, and excerpts from novels ...


1

This document, published by the International Organization of Securities Commissions, states three objectives and describes thirty-eight principles of securities regulation: https://www.iosco.org/library/pubdocs/pdf/IOSCOPD561.pdf Objectives Protect investors ensuring that markets are fair, efficient and transparent; reducing systemic risk. The ...


1

Nothing will be better than going through the textbook. Lecture's slides can be beneficial, you can google newer versions or access older here: http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~mirobins/econ212.html. I also used notes done by Łukasz Woźny, from SGH: http://web.sgh.waw.pl/lwozny/LectureNotes.pdf - they are not entirely based on Varian's textbook but might be helpful ...


1

You might be interested in David Romer's Advanced Macroeconomics. It's a grad-level textbook that includes grad-level math, but the focus is off the math and on the intuition. It doesn't spend much time going over certain tools, like dynamic programming, so it gets a bit hand-wave-y at some points, but it sounds like this might be the right balance for you.


1

In the story category I also very much recommend Robert Frank's the economic naturalist. It is basically a collection of stories written by his students explaining everyday's little mysteries with economic principles such as that benefits need to outweigh costs, competition and when it does (not) work, and disagreement between socially desired and market ...


1

Obstfeld and Rogoff (Foundations of International Macroeconomics) or Romer (Advanced Macroeconomics) both cover a lot and present all the math.


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