Hot answers tagged

7

Short answer It doesn't seem like you've tried very hard to find estimation using Dynare (google results of "Dynare estimation"). Dynare is in fact capable of doing estimation and typically people use some sort of data to estimate the parameters that govern their model. Longer Answer What is a DSGE model? A DSGE model is a series of equations (and ...


6

The mathematical theory behind DSGE models can be found in any textbook on stochastic dynamic optimisation. One common reference that economists use for this is Stokey, Lucas and Prescott. Of course, they focus exclusively on recursive methods, but (perhaps) the lion’s share of dynamic problems in economics are solved in this way. There is also a treatment ...


6

Heuristically, you can think of the integral as just a sum: $$ \bar{C} = \left( \sum_{i=1}^n C_i^{1-\frac{1}{\epsilon}} \right)^{\frac{\epsilon}{\epsilon - 1}} $$ where $\bar{C}$ is an index of aggregate consumption, and utility is given by $u \left( \bar{C} \right)$. It's easy to check that the marginal rate of substitution between goods $j$ and $k$ is ...


6

The "standard" New Keynesian model could be many things, but suppose that we're dealing with the basic log-linearized 3-equation model (intertemporal Euler equation, New Keynesian Phillips curve, and monetary policy rule) exhibited, for instance, in Gali's textbook. In most variants of this simple model, a temporary increase in government expenditure will ...


5

Short answer: no. Dynare, and linearization/perturbation methods in general, are designed for solving smooth models approximated around a single point in state space (the steady state). A model with fixed cost is typically non-smooth, and its behavior away from the steady state may be very different, if e.g. the firm switches from investing to not ...


5

I've just solved this problem. First of all, your solution does not make too much sense, as in a simple interest rate rule it must hold that the sum of all coefficients must be greater than one. In your case this means that $\phi>1$. Therefore, the series would converge not to zero. Second, an interest rate rule should try to offset fluctuations. This ...


5

As mentioned by Michael quantecon has good resources. Here is an example of very simple DSGE model from quantecon. I am not sure if you can get to as low as 3 equations but here is very simple example of real business cycle DSGE by Chad Fulton. I won't copy all the code from the site, you can just follow the link which has full code, but it is based on the ...


4

Jordi Galís book "Monetary Policy, Inflation, and the Business Cycle" features the 3-equation "Simple New Keynesian" Model: \begin{align*} \pi_t &= \beta E_t[\pi_{t+1}] + \kappa\tilde{y_t}\\ \tilde{y}_t &= -\frac{1}{\sigma}\left(i_t-E_t[\pi_{t+1}]-r_t^n\right)+E_t[\tilde{y}_{t+1}]\\ i_t &= \rho + \phi_\pi\pi_t + \...


3

Intuitively, it means that the model has such characteristics that "the best we can say" about remaining uncertainty, is that it will be zero. From general experience, we know that it won't be zero, but the information we possess does not permit us to say anything else than that it will be zero. The even deeper assumption here is that the information and ...


3

There's no correct method to do this. DSGE guys will estimate the model by doing something like this: plugging in priors for their parameters and then running an optimization that minimizes the distance between model and data moments while maximizing the log likelihood from the priors. The data moments for them will be well known values of variances and ...


3

It is generally not possible to make a sharp statement about the types of non-convex costs that Dynare can handle. Many different factors come into play about whether a model can be "solved" by Dynare or not. Is the steady-state correctly defined? Is the model stationary? Is the model differentiable everywhere in the ergodic set? Are the number of ...


3

To understand why macroeconomists use DSGE as a tool, in general, it's a good idea to read up on the Lucas critique. More colloquially, DSGE models provide macroeconomists with a laboratory that allows quantitative comparison (and ranking) of different economic policies. Further, the process of writing a model disciplines thinking: if one cannot write down ...


3

They consider a model with two islands: a Production island and a Leisure island. Every transition from a period $t$ to a period $t+1$ is split into two parts. People who are in the Production island at the end of period $t$, start on the Leisure island in the beginning of period $t+1$ with probability $\sigma$, and stay on the Production island with ...


2

I can think of two big ways. Formal tests of model fit: If you are using SMM, GMM or indirect influence check out the J-stat. If you are using maximum likelihood you want a likelihood ratio. Bayesian model testing is similar to likelihood ratios, but more complicated. Many of the DSGE models were rejected on these bases (you can see Sargent discussing it ...


2

The shock process is already linear. any log linearisation will result in identical expression. The underlying non linear shock process can be something like this:$ $$ Z_t = Z^{(1-\rho)} Z_{t-1} e^{\epsilon_{t}}$$ This when you linearise, you obtain your linear shock processes.


2

On the empirical side, there might be answers for you in the national accounts. I only know about the french case : the french statistical institute (INSEE) has different depreciation data for different types of capital (e.g. buildings, machines, patents) and for different sectors. These data are supposed to reflect both physical depreciation and "normal ...


2

The condition that unstable eigenvalues equal in number the control/decision/non-predetermined variables is equivalent to the requirement that a model possess the "saddle point property". Of more interest is why economists generally want their models to possess such a property, something that holds for the DSGE models. In Economics we call models with ...


2

Try to give a look at what happens to inflation's IRF. If it stays positive for the whole horizon of the IRF then simply prices have increased over time at the inflation rate. I guess that any non-degenerate price level (nominal!) is compatible with such model structure, as its system is written down in growth rates, as that's what loglinearised variables ...


2

While in GMM one uses theoretical analytical moments, in MSM one uses simulated theoretical moments instead. For GMM, [t]he method requires that a certain number of moment conditions were specified for the model. These moment conditions are functions of the model parameters and the data, such that their expectation is zero at the true values of the ...


2

This is due to the famous Lucas critique. To make long story short, in the past in the heyday of Keynesian macroeconomics it was quite normal for macroeconomists to just postulate some relationships based on relatively casual empirical observations like for example the Philips curve which says that there is positive relationship between inflation and ...


2

You can find OLG models that do not classify as DSGE (in particular, the model might not be stochastic) as well as DSGE with overlapping generations (contrary to those with infinitely lived agents). You can find more detail on this on this working paper by Assous and Duarte (2017), as they note In the early 1980s, when the real business cycle ...


2

It’s derived as follows. First start with original equation. $$(1+i_t)=(1+i^*_t)\frac{S_{t+1}}{S_t}$$ Take natural logs of both sides: $$\ln(1+i_t)=\ln(1+i^*_t)+\ln(S_{t+1}) -\ln(S_t)$$ Now you just use the following: $$s_t=\ln(S_t)$$ And use the well known fact that for small values of $i$ the following approximation holds: $$\ln(1+i)\approx i$$ And ...


2

Is there future for DSGE? Well, DSGE stands for dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models. You can’t really model time series appropriately without the dynamic stochastic part, and when it comes to general equilibrium there are economists who think that this approach does not really capture all interesting questions, as in many cases it might be more ...


2

Minimum state variable (MSV) solution is a special technique used to find an unique equilibrium with desirable properties in DSGE models. Often DSGE models can have multiple paths that will satisfy the conditions given by the system you are modelling. Hence to provide some meaningful results you have to somehow choose between the all possible paths/...


2

This is actually one of the more exciting development in DSGE modelling since financial crisis. Including financial sector or friction is definitely a growing area of research and interest. Unfortunately its quite a new development so there are not that many papers yet out there (however if you consider doing research in this field that also means there is a ...


2

I am not sure if this is exactly what you are looking for, but this paper has model that sounds like what you want: Shimer, Robert, 2006. “On-the-job search and strategic bargaining, ”European EconomicReview50, 811—830. Have a look at this one too: Shimer, R. (2007). Mismatch. American Economic Review, 97(4), 1074-1101.


1

Your formula isn't quite right. If $r$ is the nominal interest rate, and $\pi$ is the inflation rate, the real interest rate is $\frac {1+r}{1+\pi}-1$. The formula $r-\pi$ is approximation for small rates. (Note: for all of this, I'm using "rate" to mean the multiplicative factor minus one. So if the balance is multiplied by 1.2, the rate is 0.2.) ...


1

Most DSGE models don’t model heterogeneity in individual labor market. Although I suppose you could do that if you would really want to but, it would be incredibly data intensive to actually estimate. You can have some DSGE models with endogenous growth where human capital accumulation plays a role but most of them are based on just exogenous technological ...


1

Capital to output ratio can be calculated using the BLS productivity measures data. Capital to output ratio is simply K/Y. Capital (K) is usually called either capital input or capital services and output which would be called real value added output. Which can be found here: https://www.bls.gov/mfp/mprdload.htm under 1987–2019 Major Sector ...


1

On the Equivalence of Private and Public Money is a 2019 working paper by Brunnermeier and Niepelt that addresses this issue: We propose a generic model of money and liquidity. We provide sufficient conditions under which a swap of private (inside) against public (outside) money leaves the equilibrium allocation and price system unchanged. We apply ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible