7

Experimental Economics states: "The journal will also consider articles with a primary focus on methodology or replication of controversial findings." The Economics e-Journal takes replications from any field. The Behavioral Economics Replication Project could be interesting for you. They presented their research at the 2016 American Economic Association ...


7

Here is an article that reports about several laboratory experiments showing large inconsistencies between theoretical predictions and observed behavior for some payoff structures: Goeree, J.K. and Holt, C.A., 2001. Ten little treasures of game theory and ten intuitive contradictions. American Economic Review, 91, 1402-1422. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.91....


6

This question is discussed in detail in the paper: Weibull, Jörgen W. "Testing game theory." Advances in Understanding Strategic Behaviour. Palgrave Macmillan, London, 2004. 85-104. Weibull discusses the issues with not knowing the actual payoff functions, the players not knowing the actual payoff functions (incomplete information), and situations ...


5

These are widely used technical terms with a precise mathematical meaning: Ex-ante budget balance means that the expected sum of all transfers is zero. Ex-post budget balance means that the sum of all transfers is zero with probability one. Some authors require that the sum of transfers is always zero.


5

One irreducible advantage of oTree over z-Tree is that you can easily reuse/imply the entire trajectories of results per entity (session/group/player) when doing repeated games. With z-Tree, it is rather complicated (not to say impossible?) to define dynamically temporal- or individual-based autocorrelated/interdependent/recursive games. Another notable ...


4

The game you describe is known as the dictator's or ultimatum game, and indeed people typically refuse offers that are less than a 2/3-1/3 split. A lot of research has gone into this in the behavioural economics literature. There are many other situations where the predictions from the theory do not match actual behaviour, among others: people contribute ...


3

A good place to start would be the book Prospect Theory: For Risk and Ambiguity, by Peter Wakker (2010, Cambridge University Press). There is an entire area of economic theory called decision theory which studies models of decision making under uncertainty --typically, models which deviate from the classical expected utility maximization model in some way. ...


3

Gode and Sunder (1993) recorded a result similar to yours. The abstract of the paper reads: We report market experiments in which human traders are replaced by "zero-intelligence" programs that submit random bids and offers. Imposing a budget constraint (i.e., not permitting traders to sell below their costs or buy above their values) is ...


3

I suspect that the reason for that result is the way how you modeled the situation is by having the prices to be offered at random from a sample of numbers in uniform fashion (unless I am misreading the code) but this is unrealistic. As mentioned in the paper Smith's 1962: each sequence of experiments was conducted over sequences five to ten minutes long ...


3

Fake resumes are a form of deception in a manner of speaking, but the purpose of the deception is to reveal obfuscated bias in hiring practices. Not all journals take such a hard-line stance on this type of deception and as such papers can still be published. For a more robust discussion on the main dimensions that determine the judgment of deception, I ...


3

This paper:https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2712957 Is exactly what you need.


3

It was successful because it combined three things at the same time. Firstly, it increased available currency at a time when currency was scarce for any but the rich - so everyone was more solvent. Secondly, it had a negative interest rate, so the encouragement was to spend quickly. And thirdly, it was a local initiative, and belonged to the town, at a ...


3

I assume you're talking about field experiments and empirical work in general. (Not Vernon Smith's style lab experiments.) AidGrade http://www.aidgrade.org/compare-programs-by-outcome The website aggregates results from multiple programs, including those that showed no significant relationships. Also read Vivalt, “How Much Can We Generalize from Impact ...


3

The Journal of Economic Science Association, a companion journal to Experimental Economics is one outlet devoted to publishing, among other article types, replication of experiments. As said on the website of the Economic Science Association: The Journal of the Economic Science Association is dedicated to advancing theoretical, empirical, methodological and ...


2

I found an answer to the second part of the question here https://github.com/oTree-org/otree-docs/issues/2. It turns out that in oTree, the variable form which is passed to the template is iterable. Thus one the following code does the job: {% for field in form %} {% formfield field %} {% endfor %} Regarding the first part of the question, I ...


2

From German Wikipedia Monatlich musste eine Marke zu einem Prozent des Nennwertes der Note gekauft und in ein dafür vorgesehenes Feld auf der Vorderseite des Geldscheins geklebt werden, um ihn gültig zu erhalten. Which means a stamp had to bought each month at 1% of the face value of the scrip and pasted on the back of the scrip to make it valid. You ...


2

you can do a belief elicitation. See more on this here: Rauhut, H., 2013. Beliefs about lying and spreading of dishonesty: Undetected lies and their constructive and destructive social dynamics in dice experiments. PloS one, 8(11), p.e77878. and here: Gächter, S. and Renner, E., 2010. The effects of (incentivized) belief elicitation in public goods ...


2

A couple of comments to your question below: When an economic experiment is designed to have predetermined outcomes of ethical and unethical decisions, how does it address the extreme levels of deviation that is present within historical record? 1) External validity --- whether results obtained in the lab can be generalized to settings outside the lab ---...


2

The main advantage of oTree is that it works for both offline and online experiments. In contrast, zTree must be run offline. So oTree is more flexible. Even if your current experiment will be run in the lab, you might value this flexibility if you think you might run online experiments in the future. The main disadvantage is that oTree can be harder to ...


1

Interesting question. I don't have any empirical evidence to offer, so I can't answer your question if that's what you're asking for. But it's easy to provide "theoretical evidence", as it were, that your concerns may be well-founded, even without leaving the EU model. You simply need to add a decision cost --- or a cost to figure out your true WTP --- to ...


1

In experimental economics, the classic ways to measure/control for participants' social preferences are variants of the following games: The ultimatum game measures a participant's preference for fairness or justice. The dictator game measures a participant's other-regarding preference. The trust game measures the level of trust and trustworthiness among ...


1

I am not sure I understand the problems outlined in the other answers. Seems to me that if we assume students maximize their expected utility and lotteries A1 and B2 (or B1 and A2) are chosen by someone, we would have \begin{align*} 100\% \ U(B) & > 10\% \ U(A) + 89\% \ U(B) + 1\% \ U(F) \\ \\ 11\% \ U(B) + 89\% \ U(F) & < 10\% \ U(A) + 90\% \ ...


1

I am a bit confused because you said there are two treatments. I presume that one "treatment" group is the control group and the other is the treatment group. (I don't think you have a separate control group.) I am also confused because you said the treatment is identical until round 3 but then the treatment begins in round 2. I presume that there is no ...


1

It's been too long since I read those, so I don't exactly remember whether they answer your two specific questions, but if you are interested in the topic you should definitely have a look at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bottom_Billion https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_Bottom_Billion and the corresponding TED talk at http://www.ted.com/talks/...


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