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There are a lot of differences between the two crises + how these differences manifest in the stock market. First, on the point of the stock market- it's "kinda" an indicator of the overall economy. However, it's not a perfect metric; really, it reflects the weighted sentiment of those who participate. Furthermore, the stock market is more akin to ...


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There are a number of points in this question, and I do not want to write too long a response that goes too far into opinions. I will note that I am a proponent of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT). I will first address two questions. I will write from the MMT perspective, and note that I am referring to a sovereign that controls the currency it borrows in (...


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Let me start from the bottom up. "[...] is there a bigger picture which I am missing that all this global recession can be a planned activity by major economies every few years/decades to achieve something bigger?" No, global recessions usually hurt all economies and though in theory one can come up with an example where someone might benefit from a global ...


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Luxury goods tend to be Veblen goods, so reducing taxes on them doesn't make them more attractive. They also tend to be goods whose value is mainly based on scarcity, so increasing demand doesn't increase the amount supply, it just increases the equilibrium price. If diamonds were cheaper, would there be significantly more diamond jobs? There's the ...


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It depends what formula you apply. If we apply the formula as laid out by Philippe Van Parijs and Yannick Vanderborght to the United States, for a UBI consisting of 25 percent of GDP distributed on a per-capita basis, amounts to a new entitlement program costing $4.8 trillion dollars per year at a time when the United States is already facing a $1 trillion ...


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