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27 votes

How do economists explain why people contribute to Wikipedia?

Voluntarily contributing to a public good (such as Wikipedia) is a strong social norm. The tendency to follow such norms even if this is costly in the short run has developed over humans' evolutionary ...
VARulle's user avatar
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22 votes

How do economists explain why people contribute to Wikipedia?

I wouldn't underestimate the role of learning by answering. Drafting a significant text typically forces a person to put their thoughts in order, to engage in research, and then to structure the ...
Steve's user avatar
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15 votes

How do economists explain why people contribute to Wikipedia?

tl;dr: There could be multiple explanations depending on how you want to treat Wikipedia. If you want to treat Wikipedia as public good where everyone contributes a small part towards its creation and ...
1muflon1's user avatar
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8 votes

How do economists explain why people contribute to Wikipedia?

Look at the data For starters, the obvious thing is to look at the data about the self-reported reasons for contributing to wikipedia (and I'm surprised that neither the question asker nor most of the ...
Peteris's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between Ex-post Incentive Compatibility and Dominant-Strategy Incentive Compatibility

I think the right paper here is Jehiel, Meyer-ter-Vehn, Moldovanu and Zame (Econometrica 2006): The Limits of ex post Implementation. Take a direct mechanism. Ex post incentive compatibility (EPIC) ...
Bayesian's user avatar
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6 votes

What's the difference between Ex-post Incentive Compatibility and Dominant-Strategy Incentive Compatibility

In Def. 3 of the paper you link to, EPIC is not "defined as truth-telling is the best strategy no matter what the others do". What the $-i$-agents report is held fixed at $\theta_{-i}$, i.e. ...
VARulle's user avatar
  • 6,900
6 votes

Strike time in a game

Calculating a precise strike time without additional details is - in my opinion quite clearly - impossible. On the question of how to do this with additional info/assumptions: A straightforward ...
Giskard's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Is "avoiding being the bearer of bad news" an example of the "principal-agent problem"?

I think it is. Intelligent economist site states: The Principal Agent Problem occurs when one person (the agent) is allowed to make decisions on behalf of another person (the principal). In this ...
WilliamT's user avatar
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3 votes

Why is Dominant-Strategy Incentive Compatibility treated as a virtue, and are there mechanism design models which treat it as undesirable?

The games played in mechanisms are not "games in the colloquial sense". Whatever players really value is represented by their payoffs, so if they value strategic richness of a game, this is ...
VARulle's user avatar
  • 6,900
3 votes
Accepted

locating specific model from organizational economics

This looks like a contest. There is a large economic literature on contests. Have a look at this survey by Corchón and Serena. Often these papers use a Tullock contest success function or model the ...
Bayesian's user avatar
  • 5,291
2 votes

What are the economics behind web spam?

I used to work for a major online advertising network, and it's pretty much an open secret in the industry that a substantial portion of ad impressions are either bot-generated, scams to exploit ...
Bill Clark's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How can incentive compatibility be interpreted in terms of agents not wanting to imitate each other?

More or less yes. Incentive compatibility, in economics, is defined as a situation where every agent can achieve the highest utility (or best outcome using different metric) by acting according to ...
1muflon1's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Does Dominant Strategy Incentive Compatibility apply to this modification of Rock Paper Scissors?

DSIC is a possible property of a direct mechanism, not of an arbitrary game. A direct mechanism starts by players reporting their private information (i.e., types), so it is a very special kind of ...
VARulle's user avatar
  • 6,900
2 votes
Accepted

Why is Dominant-Strategy Incentive Compatibility treated as a virtue, and are there mechanism design models which treat it as undesirable?

The answer by VARulle is perfectly fine. I just want to add something and may repeat his point for completeness. A mechanism designer often has a policy goal such as efficiently allocating a good to ...
Bayesian's user avatar
  • 5,291
1 vote

Design of efficient cheap talk communication

There are some examples of this like: Kim, Kyungmin, and Philipp Kircher. "Efficient competition through cheap talk: the case of competing auctions." Econometrica 83.5 (2015): Kim, Kyungmin,...
csilvia's user avatar
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1 vote

Which mathematics are required for fully understanding the theories of the firm?

I haven't gone through all the papers so I just sampled 'The Firm as an Incentive System'. Browsing through it, it relies on Linear Algebra and Real Analysis. Again, I warn that I have not gone ...
Vedant Monger's user avatar
1 vote

Business models based on things not happening

Could you provide examples of business models, where the service provider gets rewarded for things not happening (or at least not deteriorating). I think you're asking for examples of businesses that ...
Herr K.'s user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

What is the meaning of "labor input" in the context of incentive theories?

Since the authors state that the total labor input is: $$\int t_i(k)dk$$ the meaning of the total labor input in this case would be that it is the sum of all attention $t_i$ allocated over those tasks ...
1muflon1's user avatar
  • 56.7k
1 vote
Accepted

What is a super deduction?

Deloitte managed a semi-intelligible explanation. It's called "super" when an income tax deduction is applied twice for the same item (e.g. for R&D)... In early 2015, Slovakia introduced a new ...
against very long user names's user avatar
1 vote

Incentive compatibilty conditions for multi-item auctions

Yes, it is essentially the same idea as with just one unit. For example, see the text leading to Proposition 14.1 in the book "Auction Theory" by Vijay Krishna. Let $x$ be the vector of ...
Bayesian's user avatar
  • 5,291
1 vote

What are the economics behind web spam?

I am not a data person. So I can only provide insights into the theoretical incentives behind the phenomenon. Moreover I think that there are multiple forms of such web spam and each is rooted in ...
Bayesian's user avatar
  • 5,291

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