6

It's lots of things, which added together means it's not going to happen. Firstly, the initial calculation of area required was just to illustrate how small the world's energy use is, compared to the amount of energy we receive in sunlight, even after compensating for the 20% efficiency of PV modules. So it wasn't actually intended as an engineering ...


6

There is no standard, internationally agreed definition of what should count as "a job" when conducting economic impact assessments. However, it is an important question that is often (not always) taken seriously when constructing such estimates. Sometimes it is very important that jobs estimates are comparable. This is particularly the case when ...


5

For most purposes, economics is not effectively understood in 10-second segments or catchy phrases used by politicians. Generally, a willingness to openly acknowledge that something is complex, and to acknowledge merit to empirical evidence and/or ethical argumentation on multiple sides of a debate, is a good indication that what follows has at least some ...


4

A “full explanation” would be extremely long; depending on the situation, a great many things would happen. For developing countries, defaults are typically on debt in foreign currency, issued under foreign law. They will end up in legal fights with bondholders, and/or end up dealing with the IMF (or other body) to restructure their debt. Economic problems ...


3

I'm afraid economists can offer little guidance on that issue. Apart from the fact that you ask an implicit normative question (how should people behave?) where most economists tend to be positivists, there is no clear answer to your question. As unsatisfying as that may seem it is actually quite common in science as Michael Greinecker pointed out, and ...


3

Single-peakedness of preferences is not enough to guarantee the existence of a Condorcet winner, a position that cannot be defeated in majority voting (hence preventing cycling). You would also need that the set of alternatives to admit a linear order (and single-peakedness is with respect to this order). With a linear order on alternatives and a profile ...


1

There's actually empirical research by the Fed on this, and it backs up well what Brian said: Armed with new dataset containing over one hundred foreign-law defaults and over sixty domestic-law defaults, over the period 1980-2015, we document the following key regularities about sovereign defaults. First, selective defaults exist and are frequent. Since ...


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