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The literature on this issue flip flops. The first seminal study by Sellin (1959)¹ did not find any significant effect, but early literature was riddled with methodological errors. Ehrlich’s (1975)² study at the time was far more sophisticated, and it showed a strong deterrent effect of capital punishment. However, ironically, this study later too became ...


10

The death penalty as a deterrent to crime is ineffective is the prevailing view amongst researchers and experts in the field of criminology. Some studies would indicate that there is no correlation between the death penalty and the reduction of violent crime. However, like any topic, you can find contrarian views that say there is no conclusive evidence to ...


5

Yes there is. For example: The Wealth of Nations: A Translation into Modern English by Industrial Systems Research However, you should be warned that a lot of nuance gets lost in these modern translations. That's why they are not used for serious scholarship done on Smith's work (I am not sure if you intend to read it for some serious study or just as a ...


3

I like Tadelis' book. The solution manual includes all exercises, without the rest of the text.


3

Almost all textbooks on game theory include a part on cooperative game theory and therefore also treat Nash bargaining. A random sample ($n=3$) from my shelf produced this one, this one, and this one.


3

This looks like a contest. There is a large economic literature on contests. Have a look at this survey by Corchón and Serena. Often these papers use a Tullock contest success function or model the contest as an all-pay auction, see, e.g., papers by Ron Siegel. There are papers that analyze given contests (research contests, lobbying, etc) and papers that ...


3

How about "Nowcasting" by Banbura, Marta; Giannone, Domenico; Reichlin, Lucrezia (2010). Main body is 22 pages long. From the introduction of the paper: Economists have imperfect knowledge of the present state of the economy and even of the recent past. Many key statistics are released with a long delay and they are subsequently revised. As a ...


2

In Does Government Size Affect Per-Capita Income Growth? A Hierarchical Meta-Regression Analysis, Churchill, Ugur and Yew write Since the late 1970s, the received wisdom has been that government size (measured as the ratio of total government expenditure to gross domestic product (GDP) or government consumption to GDP) is detrimental to economic growth. We ...


2

If I understand your question correctly, you would like to know what future 1y yields will be like. These are called forward rates. Because of the nature of the question and the fact that there are many ways to do forecast government yields, I'll focus on to key approaches, which are sometimes combined. For these reason the answer is only a sketch. 1) (...


2

Yes you can forecast them in a various different ways. I don't think it is possible to make full literature review in a single SE post, so I will just give some examples. You can simply use random walk: $$y_t = y_{t-1} + \epsilon_t$$ you would be surprised how far you can actually get with this silly little model (and in fact this is what EMH would suggest ...


1

One example of a book that roughly fits your requirements is Erich Prisner: Game Theory Through Examples. It is mostly introductory book but has very few extra explanations besides a walkthrough of exercises.


1

Value, Competition and Exploitation by Cogliano, Flaschel, Franke, Fröhlich and Veneziani, Classical Political Economics and Modern Capitalism by Tsoulfidis and Tsaliki provide formalizations of classical/Marxian approach, you can find them on libgen.


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