New answers tagged

3

Elasticities are partial derivatives -- so to estimate them you need to hold all other factors fixed! That would include the prices of other goods.


2

This paper is close to what you want. It is generally believed that the increased incidence of homelessness in the United States has arisen from broad societal factors, such as changes in the institutionalization of the mentally ill, increases in drug addiction and alcohol usage, and so forth. This paper presents a comprehensive test of the ...


1

Often attributing the causes due to mental illness, previous criminal activity and addiction. Homelessness is a very special phenomenon of the housing market and housing market alone. Mental illnesses, criminal activities and addictions are surely bad things, but they are ought to affect all aspects of life. Nevertheless, the poor (at least in developed ...


-1

Well, I'm not sure the claim "raise M by factor k and P will also rise by factor k" is valid unless one also stipulates that V and Y are held fixed. Indeed, interest rate policy relies on the assumption that movements in key interest rates will shift Y more than they do P, with some of that action arising from a shift in V. A two-good pure-exchange model (...


4

You are most likely looking for labor or wage share defined as the ratio of labor costs to nominal GDP. It basically expresses how much share of nominal GDP gets captured by labor. You can find the data for the labor share in the US here, under that bit of text (for some reason I could not find direct link to pure dataset). The data are from the US bureau ...


4

Several articles use data sets on this issue but I am not sure that all the data sets are freely available. Valencia & Laeven (2012) use the IMF country reports to create their data set. It covers all IMF member countries since 1970. Reinhart and Rogoff (2009) have 70 countries since roughly 1900 based on a wide set of sources. Romer & Romer (...


0

Since you already answered yourself I am just filling the textbook recommendation: You could find more on this in Blanchard et al. Macroeconomics: an European Perspective. You will find this there (assuming based on the question you are looking something at undergraduate level).


0

It's from sectorial balances. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sectoral_balances https://shadowproof.com/2012/03/07/s-i-g-t-x-m/ Although it's quite strange that I can't find it in my macroeconomics textbook. P.S. It's also worth noting that positive (G-T) represents government deficit, NOT government proficit. Although the formula can be changed to use (T-...


Top 50 recent answers are included