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You may look up the 2015 Journal of Economic Perspective paper "Why Are There Still So Many Jobs? The History and Future of Workplace Automation" by David Autor. Look up the references therein.


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In my opinion there are two alternatives which are rather complementary. Participatory Economics or PARECON by Michael Albert and Robin Hahnel : http://www.zcommunications.org/znet/topics/parecon, and the Reciprocity by Dominique Temple and Mireille Chabal (although these two are not economists) http://dominique.temple.free.fr/ and http://mireille.chabal....


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At McMaster University in Canada (#4 in Canada for research and #98 worldwide) both undergraduate and graduate (MA and above) economics programs utilize STATA for econometrics for its ease of use (real coding is not needed to get started) and for its accessibility i.e. low cost. R and R studio is utilized as well but to a far lesser degree and only in ...


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The reason why you cant find any sources on this is that you seem to be confused about what development economics and those different schools of economics are. I will first address the confusion and then give you references for some of the sources you requested. Confusion about different terms: First, development economics is a positive not normative field. ...


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Im currently in grad school of a R1 university in the US (Econ Dept). Here's my take on the issue: STATA is a very helpful tool in cleaning data and performing some preliminary analysis (enough at the undergraduate level). Beyond that people move to either R (ha very good graphics packages and very easy integration with Latex) or to Python/Julia/Matlab. ...


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Yes, A longitudinal study involves repeated observations of the same variables (e.g., people) over short or long periods of time. You can have more than two points in time for your project. It really depends on your study's converge (time periods under analysis).


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In 2008 the American Economic Association (AEA) created a reproducible research requirement about posting the code and the data for their papers. According to analysis done by the AEA Data Editor Vilhuber, Turrito, and Welch (2020), Stata and Matlab were by far the most dominant software used in these submissions (see figure below, the raw data are here). ...


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In my experience in Ecomomics I would say Stata and Matlab. Stata is widely used at the undergrad level and for microeconometrics, while Matlab is introduced more at the postgrad level for general econometrics classes. In my personal opinion there is a clear tendency in schools to push students more into programming based software (it is a useful tool for ...


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As an Economic Sciences student, I can only testify for this sector. We principally use EViews, for applied econometrics, time-series analysis. Some professors like to use the R programming language and Stata. All three are extremely powerful tools.


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Its very hard to give an actual real world example of risk neutral person (firms are just run by people only people can have attitudes to risk) not because they do not exist but because research on micro-level risk neutrality does not publishes name of its participants and all data are anonymized. You also can't say someone is risk neutral just by pointing ...


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