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A quick way to do this would be through google scholar? Papers are then available via libgen or scilib If you're part of an institution such as a university then you should have access to EBSCO Econlit which allows you to scan every economics paper using Boolean search strings to filter down to what you're looking for.


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The following recent article might be relevant to your question: Weighted representative democracy, Marcus Pivato and Arnold Soh, Journal of Mathematical Economics 88, pp.52-63, 2020. Abstract: We propose a new system of democratic representation. Any voter can choose any legislator as her representative; thus, different legislators can represent ...


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I can't suggest any research papers, but I can suggest one way of studying this problem: using an agent-based model. For example, this is a simple model of an auction on NetLogo: https://ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/models/BiddingMarket. Maybe you can tweak the code to make the model run a simulation of your problem. If this wasn't what you were looking for, ...


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Largely the same statement was issued by the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, around the same time, so no doubt there was some coordination there. In any case, border carbon adjustments are often discussed at EAERE conferences. This year's conference had a full session on their effects on international agreements (I cannot seem ...


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I gave you an extremely vague lead in my other comment. Thinking about it a bit harder, I beieve you are right with having a look into the matching literature which I know a bit less. Here is a setting that might be of interest: Kelso & Crawford, Econometrica 1982. They study $m$ workers (=buyers in your setting) and $n$ firms (=items), where a worker ...


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I found some references that might help you explore this topic. Other topics like game theory can also be applied to border carbon adjustments. LSE: https://www.lse.ac.uk/granthaminstitute/publication/the-global-consumer-incidence-of-carbon-pricing/ This is an excerpt from the website: "the author investigates complementing the EU ETS with a carbon ...


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The economist itself provides an overview, although annoyingly it doesn't include the 1999 articles mentioned by Henry. https://www.economist.com/schools-brief/?page=1


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Yes, it is essentially the same idea as with just one unit. For example, see the text leading to Proposition 14.1 in the book "Auction Theory" by Vijay Krishna. Let $x$ be the vector of willingness-to-pay. Define $U(x) = \max_z \{ q(z)x - m(z)\}$ as the equilibrium utility of type $x$. The incentive compatibility (I am quoting Krishna now) "...


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Mechanism design with multi-dimensional types (here: the willingness-to-pay for each object) is a notoriously difficult problem. Even when you abstract from bundling as you do by assuming that the seller only wants to buy one of the goods. Your problem is studied by John Thanassoulis in "Haggling over substitutes", JET 2004. Unfortunately, there is ...


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Based on the contact page my guess would be ​Gonçalo Fonseca, whose research focuses on the intersection of the history of economic thought and economic theory, or/and Leanne Ussher. You can probably drop them an email (there is an email contact).


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