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As long as the main results/conclusions of your paper don't rely solely on the non-economics literature you cite, you should be okay. In other words, it's perfectly fine to use non-economics literature to motivate or even as part of the support for your thesis, as long as you also include proper economic arguments, i.e. theoretical models or econometric ...


8

There seem to be two things: The first is that "perceived value" is not something that directly corresponds to something economists usually study. It might be related to, say, marriage patterns and household incomes, political power, or whatnot. If you can show that it is an important aspect of a problem that falls within the (vague) boundaries of ...


4

You can do whatever you want, it's your paper. Will it make it more difficult to publish? Yeah. Referees are fickle and easily annoyed. You would not be the first person to go down this route. For example, the term Maskin monotonicity is common place in implementation theory. However, some authors use another term, I believe Maskin invariance. The claim is ...


3

What are some good Phd or research programs for Economic History / Economic Thought History? The RePEc/IDEAS website publishes various rankings in economics. I would suggest checking out their ranking of authors working in Business, Economic & Financial History or History & Philosophy of Economics and see if there are people that you'd like to work ...


2

tl;dr– You can cite whatever you want regardless of field. Of course, any finding that depends on another finding suffers the errors, unreliability, and limitations of its dependencies. Quick comments: You do research, not "Economics research". Classification is a downstream matter that should be largely ignored throughout the research process. ...


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