16

There's three important dimensions for programs/languages: Convention: Having a program that everyone uses helps you to get feedback/help, work with coauthors, use other people's codes Ease of use: Since many uses in economics are routines, having the program doing these for you and making your implementation of the use easier is a big bonus Adaptability: A ...


15

If you already know how to code in MATLAB then python is more similar to it than R so I would say you will have easier time to transitioning there. Otherwise, both R and Python are programming languages so you will be able to do all those things in both of them as you can always program your own functions. The strength of R is that the language has a ...


13

In the ReplicationWiki (that I work on) we have a list of software packages that were used in more than 2000 empirical studies, mainly in the American Economic Review, American Economic Journals and Journal of Political Economy in the years 2000-2013. Stata was used by far most often (>900 times), followed by MATLAB (280), SAS (60), GAUSS (60), Excel (50), R ...


13

In my university the choice of program is considered generally irrelevant. We focus on results, and it is up to each student to determine which program is best suited for the task and user preference. You will find that using one language translates very well to another. With resources like stackoverflow, I would not be too concerned about which. I would ...


11

I never understood why discussion about specialized software should be off-topic in the specialty's website. And of course I don't agree. So: Before diving into R, which indeed appears to be the dominant (and rich) freeware for statistical computing, one can try Gretl. It is an Econometrics freeware, with a lot of functionality, a very good Random Number ...


11

For a general overview, let’s consider a following list: For Statistical Analysis: Stata, EViews (BTW, used by FED), Statistica (former Statsoft, currently Dell), Statgraphics; + Free: R (R Studio as IDE), GNU Gretl for free-riders …Oh, SAS/Stat and IBM SPSS, and plenty of Oracle stuff for completeness. + Excel add-ins, like XLStat. Algebraic packages: ...


7

The main economic journals are slowly starting to require authors to make their data and the code of their analysis available as part of the online appendix. When this is the case, it is easy to figure out which software was used. One example are recent publications in the American Economic Review. For instance, Calsamiglia, Caterina, Guillaume Haeringer, ...


7

@Pburg mentions Geogebra which is a great drawing tool with export in LaTex. Regarding graphs in LaTex, an alternative which I prefer to Geogebra is Latexdraw. If you want to use LaTex for your thesis, a good editor might also help. I personally use Texstudio.


6

If you are only looking for "A department where at least few researchers use R? ", I believe you should be able to find plenty. In my department (Vanderbilt University), I can count at least 3 grad students using R instead of Stata (oh and I guess with myself it makes 4 ;)). If you are looking for more heavily R-oriented econ department, you might ...


6

Basically it's better to use the software your PI uses! First (s)he will be able to correct your code. Second, if you're a TA for a class using one software, it's better to handle it... To find the faculty using R, either have a look at the papers/books published by one department. Or look at the R-packages published in your field and find the authors. I ...


6

I have used gambit (python) in the past and could recommend it. It also includes a small GUI which makes things very intuitive. R also has GameTheory if you prefer this platform instead


6

I would like to add on to the previous post from 1muflon1. Total agree with the post and I will try not to repeat anything said but I feel there is some additional information that is worth mentioning about both R and Python. When it comes to loops Python is faster than R, when the number of iterations is less than 1000. Below 100 steps, python is up ...


5

See RePEc's software top. You'll find much Stata, a bit Matlab, and nothing else. From long personal observations, economists' preferences are ranked like this: Stata (none) Matlab Python, R SAS, Gauss Java, C#, C, Julia are used when performance is important (heavy simulations, combinatorics, etc.). In a specific paper, software is easy to identify ...


5

From my experience (buy-side economist role), Eviews - the GUI is very convenient to deal with the most of the daily tasks e.g. updating econometrics models and forecasts; and its continuously improving interface with external databases make my life much easier R / Matlab - easy for monte carlo simulation and dealing with financial data and stochastics ...


5

I would like to start by saying that I'm not a programmer and I have never contributed to any open source project. However, I have been interested in open source for a long time and I believe that I understand the general concepts of open source and how it works. To start of, I would like to say that open source does not mean that you cannot make money on ...


5

Python is also something you could look at for econometric and/or data analysis in addition to R and Gretl mentioned above. Alternatively you could check out the Ox programming language. The Ox console is free to download for academic use. The Ox programming language is the basis for OxMetrics and it is relatively easy to use and extremely fast. For ...


5

The standard open source statistical language is R. The R-Project homepage is here. Here is a page about ARIMA in R. If you want to try using R without having to install anything, then I would recommend DataJoy, which provides a free web-based R environment. Note that R is an entire statistical computing language, so you may find that there is quite a big ...


5

Your questions asks: A society where all the players abide by the above FSF principles It won't ever happen for all players. As a counter-example, consider an engineer who invents software that can predict when a jet engine needs maintenance. It's worth millions to the airlines, who will happily pay him for the software. He has no incentive at all to ...


5

Game theory explorer (GTE) offers a web-based solver that searches for Nash equilibria of the inputted games. Its documentation highlights the main differences between GTE and Gambit: Gambit has been developed over the course of nearly 25 years and presents a library of solution algorithms, formats for storing games, ways to program the creation of ...


5

In 2008 the American Economic Association (AEA) created a reproducible research requirement about posting the code and the data for their papers. According to analysis done by the AEA Data Editor Vilhuber, Turrito, and Welch (2020), Stata and Matlab were by far the most dominant software used in these submissions (see figure below, the raw data are here). ...


4

My main suggestions would be: Adobe Illustrator, which will let you draw graphs freehand. This is a very powerful professional illustration tool that will allow you to produce crisp vector images (if you don't know the difference between a vector image and a raster image then you should look that up before starting). PGF TikZ / PGFplots. This is my ...


4

As suggested above, R is an excellent language/program and suitable for almost anything in economics. However, if you're looking for a free graphical interface program like Eviews, I'd give gretl (http://gretl.sourceforge.net/) a try.


4

The National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) are used to calculate GDP. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) prepares methodology papers discussing how they calculate various contributions to the NIPA. They happen to have one on software for business software and this paper should be of use: This section describes the methodologies used to prepare (1) ...


4

Another R code that does it... m <- 100 p <- c(1, 2) curve(m/p[2] - p[1]/p[2]*x, from = 0, to = m/p[1], lwd = 2, xlab = expression(x[1]), ylab = expression(x[2]))


4

It is a huge financial database which consents you to export data easily via the datastream tool for excel. There you can find common data (such as those available via online databases, e.g. yahoo finance or investing) but also intra-day data, indexes, analysis and the platform consent you to apply directly some statistical techniques. It is a great source, ...


4

At McMaster University in Canada (#4 in Canada for research and #98 worldwide) both undergraduate and graduate (MA and above) economics programs utilize STATA for econometrics for its ease of use (real coding is not needed to get started) and for its accessibility i.e. low cost. R and R studio is utilized as well but to a far lesser degree and only in ...


3

Just to add to what is here, a lot of economists who do heavy work (dynamic programming, structural estimation) can't get away with using a language like Matlab that isn't compiled. From older economists (tenured faculty, say) I see a surprising amount of fortran for these applications. C++ may be more popular among younger economists for the same job, but ...


3

If you feel LaTex is too much you can download a free math extension for word that's easy to use. http://www.eduap.com/wordmat/ (I would recommend LaTex, but starting using LaTex, R and writing a thesis can be a bit much at the same time) Also, atop of R - get R-Studio


3

To add to the anecdotal evidence collection, I also have experienced that Stata is the most standard stats software. EViews is another option. As for other programs, beside statistical analysis software, LaTeX is a programming language used to format documents for presentation.


3

This really depends on your school or profession as to what is most prevalent. Professors at my school seem to use mostly Matlab and Stata. Some subjects even require GAUSS, which I had never heard of before. There is also some python involved. In my experience (anecdotal), the finance sector uses excel a lot.


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