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Not all stocks fall. Financials react well to rising rates. When rates rise, that can be a sign for a booming economy, which means government will collect more tax/revenue. And if inflation is high, this means they'll pay less than they borrowed. So real-rates matter. However, many governments (E.g. emerging markets) borrow in USD, and when USD rates rise ...


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It depends how quickly a company/ individual/ country rolls over their debt. Imagine you have a mortgage that has an interest rate that is indexed to fed funds rate, you'll instantly feel the rate increase and you will instantly start trying to balance your books(austerity). Compared to if you have a 20 year fixed mortgage where you don't really care what ...


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This is not an economics question (also not quant.se). There is money.stackexchange for basic personal finance questions. The price says it all - it will be a fraction of the SPX400 and that fraction determines how many shares. E.g. if it is 1/10th of the price, it will be 1/10th of the shares. If SPX400 trades at 2780, IJH will trade at 278. There are some ...


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The Blame is in the FED. First of all is important to know about one of the more important theories about economy Austrian Business Cycle Theory (ABCT), this was proposed by Ludwig von Mises and the Nobel prize Friedrich A. Hayek, in their books "Money and Interest" by Ludwig von Mises, and "Prices and Production and other goods" by Hayek....


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