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Yes an example of such study is this Sheppard, S., & Udell, A. (2016). Do Airbnb properties affect house prices. Williams College Department of Economics Working Papers, 3. This is their conclusion: We find that in New York City, the impacts appear to be that an increase in localized Airbnb availability is associated with an increase in property ...


3

There are different notions of neutrality of technical progress in macroeocnomics. You can have Hicks-neutral technical progress - that is a technical progress that increases the marginal productivity of all factors of production by the same proportion at the same capital-labor ratio. An example of Hicks-neutral production function would be one where $Y^*= ...


3

I'm an economist by training who also is a programmer and works with a lot of data scientists, so I've some insight into this area. One of my projects at the Urban Institute is trying to bridge the gap between these fields, and part of our work, supported by the Sloan Foundation, is publicly available here. To some degree the answer is yes, but there are ...


2

It means that computers (or IT in general) contribute to the society (they make us better off and more productive at work), but this does not show up in GDP statistics. The reason is that many of these services are for free. As an example, the value of the Google Search is not reflected in a market price for running this search. The problem is related to the ...


2

The paper "The impact of scale on energy intensity in freight transportation" by Gucwa and Schaefer has some of the information you need. Figure 5 from that paper is presented below: The site ShipMap.Org has a data visualisation of shipping routes, where you can filter by type of freight. (Disclosure: these are all colleagues of mine except Gucwa)


2

tl;dr: R&D spending cannot stimulate economy during just by increasing long-run aggregate supply because recessions are fluctuations around the long-run aggregate supply and not necessary affected by the long-run aggregate supply. A in which spending on R&D in principle could be more effective in fighting recessions than other spending. The ...


2

I found this excellent Economic Letter from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco that speaks to this observation. It is from Carl R. Walsh (july 16,2004) (https://www.frbsf.org/economic-research/publications/economic-letter/2004/july/the-productivity-and-jobs-connection-the-long-and-the-short-run-of-it/ ) In this letter he notes that, newspaper ...


1

Capital accumulation would still appear as investment GDP. Its possible theres other applications for this spending that would result in higher gdp. For example, GDP spiked in ww2 because military spending happens to be very efficient at inflating GDP. So it is intuitively plausible that potential output is hidden by rising investment- the closest equivalent ...


1

The logic you presented is known as technological unemployment. It is true that due to technological improvements, you would need less people to do the same amount of work. But along with technological progress, you would need more highly skilled workers to operate these high-tech machinery. What Mankiw meant (at least according to me) is that the demand ...


1

It would be helpful if you could let us know the papers you found, some of the background experience you have, and some more specifics. This might be a useful paper nonetheless.


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Solow's Model - and much of growth theory - is somewhat based on resource saving technical change: economies get more productive by producing more output with the same amount of inputs. This is a very useful framework in a "steel and wheat" economy, but loses explanatory power when you want to account Google Translator and similar services which are for ...


1

There seems to be a lot of misconceptions regarding the use of technology in economics. Its important to remember a two points. 1. Modern economic theory is mostly, just a branch of Applied Math Sure there are lots of fundamental philosophical concepts underlying the economics as a social science, however most practical problems require some calculus or ...


1

The Solow model was indeed the first model to account for technological progress. While models like the the Harrod-Domar model and the Neo-Marxian Feldman–Mahalanobis model conciser investment and saving as contributors to economic growth, they don't consider any measure of technology like total factor productivity to contribute to economic growth, like ...


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