5 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between HM Treasury and HM Exchequer?

Collection of tax revenue in the UK is the responsibility of neither of those but of HM Revenue & Customs which has the status of a non-ministerial department. HM Treasury is the UK's economic ...
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  • 6,833
3 votes
Accepted

UK Government Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme Funding

It is not correct to say that the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is essentially providing loans. A little background. The UK government currently has two major schemes to support businesses and ...
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  • 6,833
1 vote

Why could a CO2 producer in the UK not just increase its price to match input price increases?

I'm not an economist but let me add some chemical engineering background to the issue to explain the "why". They aren't really in the business as a "CO2 producer". Food-grade CO2 ...
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  • 111
1 vote

Why could a CO2 producer in the UK not just increase its price to match input price increases?

I had exactly the same question, and it appears they now have done so. I’m not quite sure why government needed to be involved in negotiations here. The cost of CO2 will rise from £200 per ton to £...
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  • 148
1 vote

Does the UK have a trade agreement with Australia?

No, the UK does not have a trade agreement with Australia. Since it is still a member of both the European Union's Single Market and Customs Union (EU SM&CU), it is covered by all of the EU's ...
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  • 8,012
1 vote

Meaning of UK Employment Change Index - 3 Months Average

Let's say the raw series is $x_1, x_2, \ldots$. The three-month moving average is given by $y_n = \frac 1 3 \cdot (x_{n-2}+x_{n-1}+x_n)$. What you have, though is $z_n = y_n - y_{n-1} = \frac 1 3 \...
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  • 2,764
1 vote

The economics of a "no deal" Brexit

Brexit economic forecasts usually assume that Brexit will happen and nothing more than Brexit. In other words forecasters will not assume other changes which may be pro-growth. For example they will ...
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  • 934
1 vote

The economics of a "no deal" Brexit

Maybe someone can get into more details, but generally speaking The range of estimates is large, from a loss of GDP of nearly ten percentage points (in the least attractive trade and inward ...
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  • 3,730
1 vote

How did the UK become so indebted?

Most countries hover around 100% of GDP or less in debt. Anything over that is pretty much considered bad. However, it really depends on why the debt increased. If it helps the economy more than the ...
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  • 152
1 vote

How will the UK's economy be affected, if it will be a hard Brexit?

The UK government published "Implications for Business and Trade of a No Deal Exit on 29 March 2019" on Tuesday.
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  • 1,346

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