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Diff-in-Diff is a parametric model. A rule of thumb for parametric models is that you should have at least 25-30 observations (different authors might disagree but it is around 30) per independent regressor used in your model (see discussion in Verbeek A Guide to Modern Econometrics pp 36). However, note this is a rule of thumb and as Verbeek points out (my ...


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Elasticity of demand is normally considered in relation to market demand for a good, that is, the sum of individual customer demands. Different customers will probably respond in different ways to a price increase. If the increase is 5%, especially on a low value item, very likely many customers will not notice, some will notice but not change their buying ...


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The standard elasticity still makes sense. Elasticity is not necessarily constant. Also, I am not sure what sort of formula you learned at your college but elasticity is rigorously defined (and also taught at college level for econ majors) as $EL = \frac{df(x)}{dx}\frac{x}{f(x)}$ for some function $f(x)$ (see Essential Mathematics for Economic Analysis by ...


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According to advocates of MMT, the primary risk once the economy reaches full employment is inflation, which can be addressed by gathering taxes to reduce the spending capacity of the private sector. This statement is in accord with MMT, and it can be traced back to the concept of Functional Finance. One could do a search for Abba Lerner’s articles on ...


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Does Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) provide a useful insight into how to manage the economy? That depends on your definition of MMT, because it is not generally agreed on what it even is. You will find some arguing it is just a macro/monetary theory (such as the Wikipedia page) but then I seen MMT proponents on this site arguing it is a whole new paradigm ...


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Price elasticity of demand of $-0.5$ means that if price increases by $1\%$ demand decreases by $0.5\%$ (and vice versa in case of decrease). Consequently, if the equilibrium quantity with floor is $100$ and the price of lettuce is $25\%$ that means that eliminating the price flow - which will offset the $25\%$ will increase the quantity demanded by: $$0.5\...


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There could be many answers, but the one that comes to my mind immediately is product differentiation. If you're selling exactly the same thing as everyone else, buyers are going to flock to the lowest price buyer, so you everyone will have to follow a price cut. But say you are selling ice cream cones on the boardwalk at the beach. Any little thing, such as ...


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The $\gamma$ on the RHS comes from applying chain rule when differentiating the second term with respect to $a_i$. Regarding elasticity, note that with a differentiable function $f$, the ratio $f'(x)/f(x)$ can be interpreted as the percentage change in the value of $f$ around $x$. So isolating $\gamma$ from the FOC, you'll get an expression for elasticity, ...


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It just comes from the derivative of profit function. I assume that $a_i$ is the choice variable here so the derivative of $\pi$ wrt $a_i$ is (step by step): $$\frac{\partial \pi}{ \partial a_i} = \frac{\partial \pi}{ \partial a_i} [ \ln R(a_i) ] + \frac{\partial \pi}{ \partial a_i} [ \ln N_i(\gamma a_i, \gamma a_{-i}) ] \\ = \frac{1}{ R(a_i)} R'(a_i) ...


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